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METHOD OF PREVENTING PAPER JAMS IN A PAPER PATH BY SENSING CURLED PAPER

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027692D
Original Publication Date: 1998-Oct-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-08
Document File: 4 page(s) / 249K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

An original document is positioned in a document handler 27 on a Raster Input Scanner (RIS) indicated generally by reference numeral 28. The RIS contains document XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 23, No. 5 September/October 1998 249

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 35% of the total text.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

METHOD OF PREVENTING PAPER JAMS IN A PAPER PATH BY SENSING CURLED PAPER Int. CL G03g 21/16 Robert A. Gross

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1. 399/111

An original document is positioned in a document handler 27 on a Raster Input Scanner (RIS) indicated generally by reference numeral 28. The RIS contains document

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 23, No. 5 September/October 1998 249

[This page contains 1 picture or other non-text object]

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METHOD OF PREVENTING PAPER JAMS IN A PAPER PATH BY SENSING CURLED PAPER (CONT'D)

illumination lamps, optics, a mechanical scanning drive and a Charge Coupled Device (CCD) array. The RIS captures the entire original document and converts it to a series of raster scan lines. This information is transmitted to an Electronic Subsystem (ESS) which controls a Raster Output Scanner (ROS) described below. A photoconductive belt 10 is made from a photoconductive material coated on a ground layer, which, in turn, is coated on an anti-curl backing layer. Belt 10 moves in the direction of arrow 13 to advance successive portions sequentially through the various processing stations disposed about the path of movement thereof. Belt 10 is entrained about stripping roller 14, tensioning roller 16 and drive roller 20. As roller 20 rotates, it advances belt 10 in the direction of arrow 13.

Initially, a portion of the photoconductive surface passes through charging station A. At charging station A, a corona generating device indicated generally by the reference numeral 22 charges the photoconductive belt 10 to a relatively high, substantially uniform potential

At an exposure station, B, a controller or electronic subsystem (ESS), indicated generally by reference numeral 29, receives the image signals representing the desired output image and processes these signals to convert them to a continuous tone or greyscale rendition of the image which is transmitted to a modulated output generator, for example the raster output scanner (ROS), indicated generally by reference numeral 30. Preferably, ESS 29 is a self-contained, dedicated minicomputer. The image signals transmitted to ESS 29 may originate from a RIS as described above or from a computer, thereby enabling the electrophotographic printing machine to serve as a remotely located printer for one or more computers. Alternatively, the printer may serve as a dedicated printer for a high- speed computer. The signals from ESS 29, corresponding to the continuous tone image desired to be reproduced by the printing machine, are transmitted to ROS 30. ROS 30 includes a laser with rotating polygon mirror blocks. The ROS will expose the photoconductive belt to record an electrostatic latent image thereon corresponding to the continuous tone image received from ESS 29. As an alternative, ROS 30 may employ a linear array of Light Emitting Diodes (LEDs) arranged to illuminate the charged portion of photoconductive belt 10 on a raster-by-raster basis...