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METHOD FOR BONDING NOZZLE APERTURE PLATES

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027721D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Feb-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 112K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for providing an ink nozzle plate with additional holes in proper locations for temporarily bonding the nozzle plate to the remaining die module or print element. Nozzle aperture plates are made from thin films such as 25 microns thick UpilexTM having holes roughly the same as or slightly smaller than the size of an ink jet channeL The holes are created by photographically patterning a photosensitive organic film or more typically by laser ablation or by punching. An adhesive layer is typically added to the frlm before laser ablation. One hole is made for each fluidic ink jet channel on the print head dye. Once the film is created, the film must be aligned to the channels so that each hole in the nozzle aperture plate is matched correctly with the corresponding ink jet nozzle. With the film in place the film can be bonded, by an adhesive, to the die face.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

METHOD FOR BONDING NOZZLE APERTURE PLATES Mildred Calistri-Yeh
Ahon P. Fisher
John R. Andrews
Lori A. Bryce
Robert M. Rottman
William G. Hawkins

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1. 3471047 Int. C1. B41j 2/14

Disclosed is a method for providing an ink nozzle plate with additional holes in proper locations for temporarily bonding the nozzle plate to the remaining die module or print element.

Nozzle aperture plates are made from thin films such as 25 microns thick UpilexTM having holes roughly the same as or slightly smaller than the size of an ink jet channeL The holes are created by photographically patterning a photosensitive organic film or more typically by laser ablation or by punching. An adhesive layer is typically added to the frlm before laser ablation. One hole is made for each fluidic ink jet channel on the print head dye. Once the film is created, the film must be aligned to the channels so that each hole in the nozzle aperture plate is matched correctly with the corresponding ink jet nozzle. With the film in place the film can be bonded, by an adhesive, to the die face.

The current method for bonding nozzle aperture plates to the die includes a very time consuming epoxy curing step. The die is fust heated; the nozzle plate is then aligned to the die, the two pieces are brought into contact with a small amount of pressure and frnally they are heated while mounted on an alignment stage. Typically, the alignment takes about five minutes while a B-stage cure step takes approximately twenty minutes preventing additional alignments to be made on the alignment stage. Post alignment cure time can be sixty minutes.

The difficulty with this method is that when the adhesive is slowly curing around the perimeter of the die, including the plastic cartridge and heat sink surfaces, a substantial lateral pull is generated on the film due to differential wetting that causes the film to slide out of alignment.

XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL - Vol. 24, No. 1 January/F...