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Browse Prior Art Database

GRAPHICS CREATION FOR PRINTING

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027819D
Original Publication Date: 1999-Dec-31
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-09
Document File: 2 page(s) / 137K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Graphics creation programs currently allow users to create colors that cannot be printed, causing users to be disappointed when the printed result does not look good. This disclosure enables users to see on the screen, during the creation process, what the printed output will look like, thus encouraging the user to create with colors which will look good when printed. There are several ways to accomplish this, all tied to the concept of soft proofing on the user interface of an electrophotographic printing machine.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

GRAPHICS CREATION FOR PRINTING

Paul G. Roetling James E. Bollman Raja Balasubramanian Robert J. Rolleston

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1. 399/081 Int. C1. G03g 15/00

Graphics creation programs currently allow users to create colors that cannot be printed, causing users to be disappointed when the printed result does not look good. This disclosure enables users to see on the screen, during the creation process, what the printed output will look like, thus encouraging the user to create with colors which will look good when printed. There are several ways to accomplish this, all tied to the concept of soft proofing on the user interface of an electrophotographic printing machine.

Soft proofing is done by running colors through the printer's transformations of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black values driving the printer. Then, backing out through a printer model to predict the colors actually printed before running through monitor transformations to create those values that drive the display. The net result of the computations can be expressed as a single net transformation from the original color specified to values used to drive the display monitor also called the Printer Equivalent Monitor Transformation (PEMT). In soft proofing, this PEMT is used to display the graphic after it has been created, showing the user how it will look when printed. This is useful, but too late to help, unless one goes back to iterate the design to use better color selections. The disclosed concept suggested here shows the soft proofed version during the creation process, so the user, during the design process, chooses colors which will make the printed result look good. There are at least 2 ways to accomplish this:

Method A, if one is creating a graphics creation program, the option can be built into the software. There can be a user option to select whether the result is to be used in a display or whether it is intended to be printed. If the user states that the result is intended for printing, the user is asked to specify the intended printer. In modern systems, where the printer characteristics are described in profiles within the Operating System (OS), the program finds the printer characteristics and creates the PEMT. The program then displays its user interface with the normal display, but the program converts the images through the PET before sending image data to the 0s for display and thus, showing images as they would look when printed.

Xerox Disclosure Journal - Vol. 24, No. 6 NovemberlDecember 1999 273

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GRAPHICS CREATION FOR PRINTING (Cont'd)...