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Browse Prior Art Database

FRICTION FEEDER IMAGE OFFSET FIX

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027883D
Original Publication Date: 2001-Jun-30
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-09
Document File: 3 page(s) / 79K

Publishing Venue

Xerox Disclosure Journal

Abstract

Disclosed is a friction feeder image offset solution for document sheet feeders employing friction drive rolls often used in electrophotographic printing machines. A friction document feeder, whether friction-retard, active-retard, or semi-active retard, will offset poorly adhered images such as images written in pencil. The feed roll or belt, when driving the document, drives with sufficient friction and pressure to transfer a portion of the image material (pencil lead in this case) to the feed roll. On the subsequent feed roll revolution, the same friction and pressure transfers a portion of the offset image back to the document substrate as a "ghost" image.

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XEROX DISCLOSURE JOURNAL

FRICTION FEEDER IMAGE OFFSET FIX

Stephen J. Wenthe, Jr. Robert F. Rubscha

Proposed Classification
U. S. C1.3991361 Int. C1. G03g 15/00

Xerox Disclosure Journal - Vol. 25, No. 3 May/June 2001

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143

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FRICTION FEEDER IMAGE OFFSET FIX (Cont'd)

Disclosed is a friction feeder image offset solution for document sheet feeders employing friction drive rolls often used in electrophotographic printing machines. A friction document feeder, whether friction-retard, active-retard, or semi-active retard, will offset poorly adhered images such as images written in pencil. The feed roll or belt, when driving the document, drives with sufficient friction and pressure to transfer a portion of the image material (pencil lead in this case) to the feed roll. On the subsequent feed roll revolution, the same friction and pressure transfers a portion of the offset image back to the document substrate as a "ghost" image.

The apparatus disclosed herein and illustrated in the accompanying figure solves the problem by placing the Take-Away Roll 10 (TAR) immediately downstream from the feeder, close enough that the TAR 10 takes over the drive function while the feeder is still in the margin of the sheet. The feed clutch shuts off before the image area reaches a feed nip 12, so the image passes through feed nip 12 while the feed roll is merely idling on the paper. This disables the offsetting mechani...