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Unmanaged Networks IPv6 Transition Scenarios (RFC3750)

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000027935D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-13
Document File: 21 page(s) / 48K

Publishing Venue

Internet Society Requests For Comment (RFCs)

Related People

C. Huitema: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This document defines the scenarios in which IPv6 transition mechanisms are to be used in unmanaged networks. In order to evaluate the suitability of these mechanisms, we need to define the scenarios in which these mechanisms have to be used. One specific scope is the "unmanaged network", which typically corresponds to a home or small office network. The scenarios are specific to a single subnet, and are defined in terms of IP connectivity supported by the gateway and the Internet Service Provider (ISP). We first examine the generic requirements of four classes of applications: local, client, peer to peer and server. Then, for each scenario, we infer transition requirements by analyzing the needs for smooth migration of applications from IPv4 to IPv6.

This text was extracted from an ASCII text file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 8% of the total text.

Network Working Group C. Huitema

Request for Comments: 3750 Microsoft

Category: Informational R. Austein

ISC

S. Satapati

Cisco Systems, Inc.

R. van der Pol

NLnet Labs

April 2004

Unmanaged Networks IPv6 Transition Scenarios

Status of this Memo

This memo provides information for the Internet community. It does

not specify an Internet standard of any kind. Distribution of this

memo is unlimited.

Copyright Notice

Copyright (C) The Internet Society (2004). All Rights Reserved.

Abstract

This document defines the scenarios in which IPv6 transition

mechanisms are to be used in unmanaged networks. In order to

evaluate the suitability of these mechanisms, we need to define the

scenarios in which these mechanisms have to be used. One specific

scope is the "unmanaged network", which typically corresponds to a

home or small office network. The scenarios are specific to a single

subnet, and are defined in terms of IP connectivity supported by the

gateway and the Internet Service Provider (ISP). We first examine

the generic requirements of four classes of applications: local,

client, peer to peer and server. Then, for each scenario, we infer

transition requirements by analyzing the needs for smooth migration

of applications from IPv4 to IPv6.

Huitema, et al. Informational [Page 1]

RFC 3750 Unmanaged Networks IPv6 Transition Scenarios April 2004

Table of Contents

1. Introduction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

2. Topology . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

3. Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4

3.1. Local Applications . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

3.2. Client Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

3.3. Peer-to-Peer Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

3.4. Server Applications. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5

4. Application Requirements of an IPv6 Unmanaged Network. . . . . 6

4.1. Requirements of Local Applications . . . . . . . . . . . 6

4.2. Requirements of Client Applications. . . . . . . . . . . 7

4.2.1. Privacy Requirement of Client Applications . . . 7

4.3. Requirements of Peer-to-Peer Applications. . . . . . . . 8

4.4. Requirements of Server Applications. . . . . . . . . . . 9

5. Stages of IPv6 Deployment. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

5.1. Case A, Host Deployment of IPv6 Applications . . . . . . 10

5.1.1. Application Support in Case A. . . . . . . . . . 10

5.1.2. Addresses and Connectivity in Case A . . . . . . 11

5.1.3. Naming Services in Case A. . . . . . . . . . . . 12

5.2. Case B, IPv6 Connectivity with Provider Support. . . . . 12

5.2.1. Application Support in Case B. . . . . . . . . . 12

5.2.2. Addresses and Connectivity in Case B . . . . . . 13

5.2.3. Naming Services in Case B. . . . . . . . . . . . 14

5.3. Case C, IPv6 Connectivity without Provider Support . . . 14

5.3.1. Application Support in Case C. . . . . . . . . . 15

5.3.2. Addresses and Connectivity in Case C . . . . . . 15

5.3.3. Naming Services in Case C. . . . . . . . ....