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Using Natural Language Understanding to Improve Portal Navigation

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000028015D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Apr-19
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Apr-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A method is disclosed for applying Natural Language Understanding techniques to portals as a way of helping the user efficiently find content and navigate to what they need. A particular manifestation is to provide a small chat window in the portal, which allows the user to type what they are looking for, rather than speaking it. The system analyzes the language of the query and then navigates to the correct page, portlet, and portlet state. Since the system knows a great deal about each portlet, include its name, category, keywords, and what actions it can perform, this can be done in an effective and automated way.

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Using Natural Language Understanding to Improve Portal Navigation

A method is disclosed for application of Natural Language Understanding techniques to portals as a way of helping the user efficiently find content and navigate to what they need.

A portal is commonly defined as a single point of entry for a company's web applications and services. In commercial portal frameworks, the portal consists of many pages, with each page composed of many individual applications called "portlets". Each portlet is independent of all the others, but may communicate with the other portlets by exchanging messages. Portals are typically shown in web browsers on desktops or mobile computers, and the portal builds each page uses a series of templates called skins and themes, and renders each portlet using a well-established API.

It is also possible to access the portal using a voice interface, without any visual representation at all. In this case, the same algorithms are used to build the page, but the output is a different markup which is well-suited to voice browers. The navigation style is essentially a menu where the user moves up and down through the hierarchy of choices. It is well-known that such navigation can be difficult as the number of choices increases, because users are unable to remember all the choices and their current location in the hierarchy.

In the case of the voice portal, we know from prior art that techniques from the field of Natural Language understandin...