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ELECTROPHORETIC DISPLAYS INCORPORATING ELECTROLUMINESCENT, FLUORESCENT OR PHOSPHORESCENT MATERIALS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000028147D
Publication Date: 2004-Apr-28

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention relates to electrophoretic displays incorporating lectroluminescent, fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, and to processes for the production of such displays.

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ELECTROPHORETIC DISPLAYS INCORPORATING ELECTROLUMINESCENT, FLUORESCENT OR PHOSPHORESCENT MATERIALS

Background of Invention

[0001] This invention relates to electrophoretic displays incorporating electroluminescent, fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, and to processes for the production of such displays.

[0002] The term "electro-optic" as applied to a material or a display, is used herein in its conventional meaning in the imaging art to refer to a material having first and second display states differing in at least one optical property, the material being changed from its first to its second display state by application of an electric field to the material. Although the optical property is typically color perceptible to the human eye, it may be another optical property, such as optical transmission, reflectance, luminescence or, in the case of displays intended for machine reading, pseudo-color in the sense of a change in reflectance of electromagnetic wavelengths outside the visible range.

[0003] Electrophoretic displays have been the subject of intense research and development for a number of years. Such displays can have attributes of good brightness and contrast, wide viewing angles, state bistability, and low power consumption when compared with liquid crystal displays. (The terms bistable and bistability are used herein in their conventional meaning in the art to refer to displays comprising display elements having first and second display states differing in at least one optical property, and such that after any given element has been driven, by means of an addressing pulse of finite duration, to assume either its first or second display state, after the addressing pulse has terminated, that state will persist for at least several times, for example at least four times, the minimum duration of the addressing pulse required to change the state of the display element.) Nevertheless, problems with the long-term image quality of these displays have prevented their widespread usage.

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For example, particles that make up electrophoretic displays tend to settle, resulting in inadequate service-life for these displays.

[0004] Numerous patents and applications assigned to or in the names of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and E Ink Corporation have recently been published describing encapsulated electrophoretic media. Such encapsulated media comprise numerous small capsules, each of which itself comprises an internal phase containing electrophoretically-mobile particles suspended in a liquid suspension medium, and a capsule wall surrounding the internal phase. Typically, the capsules are themselves held within a polymeric binder to form a coherent layer positioned between two electrodes. Encapsulated media of this type are described, for example, in U.S. Patents Nos. 5,930,026; 5,961,804; 6,017,584; 6,067,185; 6,118,426; 6,120,588; 6,120,839; 6,124,851; 6,130,773; 6,130,774; 6,172,798; 6,177,921; 6,...