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Browse Prior Art Database

Interactive Bubble Text for Numeric Textfields Displayed within a PDA

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000028495D
Original Publication Date: 2004-May-17
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-May-17
Document File: 3 page(s) / 49K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

A process that allows a user to enter numeric data into a textfield within a PDA environment through the use of interactive bubble text.

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Interactive Bubble Text for Numeric Textfields Displayed within a PDA

PDAs (Personal Digital Assistants) allow users to interact with data via the use of GUI components,handwriting recognition, and hardware components, similar to computers. However, unlike computers, PDAs have a constrained real-estate environment in which screen real estate is limited and data input is typically entered through a stylus for quick navigation and operability. When users are required to enter numeric input within a textfield in a PDA environment, users typically can enter the numbers through the hardware buttons of the PDA, can use handwriting recognition for each number, or use a virtual keyboard within the real-estate of the PDA screen and press the numeric key for each number. In all instances, however, the user is forced to navigate away from the textfield to enter the numeric data, interrupting the natural flow and progression of data input. For example, assume the user is asked to select various values from a multitude of combo boxes displayed within a form. As the user progresses from one combo box to another, the user simply needs to select with a stylus, click on a selected item, and move to the next combo box. When the user is presented with a field asking for arbitrary numeric input (for example, the individual's home zipcode), the user can no longer simply select/click with the stylus. Instead, the user must either:

Stop using the stylus and interact with the hardware buttons of the PDA to enter numeric input (which usually also requires key combinations as the hardware real-estate for a PDA does not allow for buttons dedicated solely for numeric input) "Draw" each number in an area for stylus input, in which the PDA will try and recognize each number and place the value in the numeric field, as shown below in Fig. 1 Display the virtual keyboard within the screen real-estate of the PDA and press the appropriate numeric key for each number, as shown below in Fig. 2

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