Browse Prior Art Database

Dynamic Hotspot Management with RET Antennas for UMTS Core and Extension Bands

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000028894D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Jul-25
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Jul-25

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

Third generation mobile communication systems based on UMTS face the problem of an exponential increase in the power supply needed with the linear increase in the number of users in a cell. This results in smaller cell sizes compared to GSM cells, and consequently leads to an increase in the CAPEX (Capital Expenditure) and OPEX (Operative Expenditure). Moreover, with the advent of new wireless technologies, like the 802.1x family, the importance of overlay networks has increased. A third dimension is the scarceness of the frequency spectrum. Solutions for efficient usage of radio resources combined with an optimized dynamic geographical distribution are needed. In the following, a new concept is described that improves the interworking of the tilting process of RET (Remote control of Electrical Tilting) antennas and the connection management. The concept assumes that apart from the 'Core Band' (CB) allocated to UMTS, which extends from 1.92-1.98 GHz for the uplink and 2.11-2.17 GHz for the downlink, also an 'Extension Band' (EB) exists. It has been proposed by ITU-R WP8F (WARC, etc.) that this UMTS Extension Band should be in the 2.5 to 2.69 GHz region. So far, seven scenarios for the usage of the EB have been suggested by the ITU. These are depicted in Figure 1.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 15% of the total text.

Page 1 of 10

S

Dynamic Hotspot Management with RET Antennas for UMTS Core and Extension Bands

Idea: Jijun Luo, DE-Munich; Roger Abdallah Abou-Jaoude, DE-Munich; Markus Dillinger, DE- Munich; Eiman Mohyeldin, DE-Munich; Dr. Egon Schulz, DE-Munich

Third generation mobile communication systems based on UMTS face the problem of an exponential increase in the power supply needed with the linear increase in the number of users in a cell. This results in smaller cell sizes compared to GSM cells, and consequently leads to an increase in the CAPEX (Capital Expenditure) and OPEX (Operative Expenditure). Moreover, with the advent of new wireless technologies, like the 802.1x family, the importance of overlay networks has increased. A third dimension is the scarceness of the frequency spectrum. Solutions for efficient usage of radio resources combined with an optimized dynamic geographical distribution are needed. In the following, a new concept is described that improves the interworking of the tilting process of RET (Remote control of Electrical Tilting) antennas and the connection management. The concept assumes that apart from the 'Core Band' (CB) allocated to UMTS, which extends from 1.92-1.98 GHz for the uplink and 2.11-2.17 GHz for the downlink, also an 'Extension Band' (EB) exists. It has been proposed by ITU-R WP8F (WARC, etc.) that this UMTS Extension Band should be in the 2.5 to 2.69 GHz region. So far, seven scenarios for the usage of the EB have been suggested by the ITU. These are depicted in Figure 1.

For overlay networks it has been considered to have several RATs (Radio Access Technologies) to address user densities above the capacities of the active Node B in a certain region. This requires the UE (User Equipment) either to be capable of accessing different RAT interfaces, or to have its systems reconfigured by some software download operation from a SDR (Software Defined Radio) enabled network. Until now, the issue of using a secondary additional tilting-capable antenna in conjunction with the primary antenna, where this secondary antenna uses additional frequency carriers of the extension band (or other CB carriers) has not been tackled. This includes the question of how to cope with ongoing connections shortly before a tilting change, i.e. how to determine affected users, which will be subject to necessary handovers.

Hereafter, an adaptive antenna tilting approach in an overlay network is proposed and an advantageous interworking with its HO (HandOver)/connection management is described. Due to the carrier frequency separation between the extension and the core bands, co-channel interference is not generated when co-located antennas are transmitting in two different bands. If the first element is associated to a core band carrier, then an additional antenna element is required that is associated to the extension band carrier as depicted in Figure 2. In a UMTS network, the main bottleneck in such interference limited systems is the do...