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MULTIFIBER CONNECTOR ASSEMBLY

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000029121D
Publication Date: 2004-Jun-16
Document File: 3 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This article relates to the assembly of a fiber optic connector and specifically to multi-fiber connector assembly. Fiber optic connectors usually consist of an assembly of parts based around one major component, typically designated here as the "main body". The main body can be separated into two symmetrical halves along its horizontal axis to facilitate connector assembly. The main body can be a single, hollow component to allow passage of a multi-fiber ribbon that can be terminated at a fiber optic ferrule.

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This article relates to the assembly of a fiber optic connector and specifically to multi-fiber connector assembly.  Fiber optic connectors usually consist of an assembly of parts based around one major component, typically designated here as the “main body”.  The main body can be separated into two symmetrical halves along its horizontal axis to facilitate connector assembly.  The main body can be a single, hollow component to allow passage of a multi-fiber ribbon that can be terminated at a fiber optic ferrule.

Previously, fiber optic connectors have been made by initially threading the appropriate components, such as the crimp ring and main body, over a fiber ribbon and then sequentially assembling the individual pieces.  If one failed to initially pre-thread a component over the ribbon it was not possible to post-thread the component, thus the partially assembled connector may have to be scraped.  By separating the main body along its horizontal axis, one has the ability to assemble the main body at any stage of the manufacturing process. Thus the main body does not require pre-threading and fewer connectors may need to be discarded.  The two halves of the main body can be secured together by a number of means, such as, for example: (1) as shown in the illustration below, close fitting pins could be used to create a press fit assembly; 2) adhesives could be used; (3) if the main body was constructed of plastic, the halves could be bonded by ultrasonic or fusion...