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Adaptive display: Method and apparatus for displaying depth and 3-dimensional structure of a scene using biological vision inspired display with an adaptive electro-optical viewing mechanism

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000029981D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 4 Issue 8 (2004-08-25)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Aug-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 27K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

The state of art for 3-dimensional (3D) scene analysis uses a display with which different views could be obtained by the change in the users viewing angle. This means the user needs to moves to different positions in order to view various features of the 3D scene. For displaying the figure in multiple dimensions, the user needs to move to different positions. The state of art also uses eye mounted glasses for the processing of the 3D information. E.g. red and blue glasses are occasionally used in movie theatres and included in comic books. The filters separate (mostly) two distinct images on the screen or on the page so that each eye sees an image taken from a slightly different perspective. This method distorts the colours and does not provide clean image separation. The most common method now in use employs special glasses with one sheet of liquid crystal in front of each eye that rapidly turn on and off-blocking each eye at alternate times many times a second and synchronized to the display. With liquid shutter glasses, as with all the other methods, a separate image must be generated for each eye. This is accomplished by generating completely separate frames for each eye, and alternating them, perceiving the full resolution of the display device. But since this requires twice as many frames as with a non-stereo image, the display must be able to support a vertical refresh rate double that of a standard display.

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© SIEMENS AG 2004 file: 2004J08267.doc page: 1

Adaptive display: Method and apparatus for displaying depth and 3- dimensional structure of a scene using biological vision inspired display with an adaptive electro-optical viewing mechanism

Idea: Sultan Haider, DE-Erlangen; Rainer Kuth, DE-Erlangen; Rudolf Ackermann, DE-Erlangen;

Holger Dresel, DE-Erlangen; Klaus Ludwig, DE-Erlangen

The state of art for 3-dimensional (3D) scene analysis uses a display with which different views could be obtained by the change in the users viewing angle. This means the user needs to moves to different positions in order to view various features of the 3D scene. For displaying the figure in multiple dimensions, the user needs to move to different positions. The state of art also uses eye mounted glasses for the processing of the 3D information. E.g. red and blue glasses are occasionally used in movie theatres and included in comic books. The filters separate (mostly) two distinct images on the screen or on the page so that each eye sees an image taken from a slightly different perspective. This method distorts the colours and does not provide clean image separation. The most common method now in use employs special glasses with one sheet of liquid crystal in front of each eye that rapidly turn on and off-blocking each eye at alternate times many times a second and synchronized to the display. With liquid shutter glasses, as with all the other methods, a separate image must be generated for each eye. This is accomplished by generating completely separate frames for each eye, and alternating them, perceiving the full resolution of the display device. But since this requires twice as many frames as with a non-stereo image, the display must be able to support a vertical refresh rate double that of a standard display.

The new idea presents an adaptive display and a method for displaying depth and 3-dimensional structure of a scene using a biologically inspired algorithm for the adaptation of the user's viewing angle to the plane of the monitor. The monitor uses an adaptive electro-optical viewing mechanism. The apparatus and algorithm is based on biological inspiration from human visual system and is helpful for assisting surgeons in performing the operations (detection of the boundaries of a tumor, inserting synthetic objects into human body). It also makes videoconferencing pleasant and reduces the backbone related problems to a large extent.

The idea presents solution in two different steps. Firstly, by adaptively aligning the plane of the monitor to the optimum position (by tracking and aligning the eyeballs), that causes the minimum displacement of the head (this is also a synchronization phase for aligning the plane of the monitor to the user's viewing angle). Secondly, by showing different views to the user as per the user preferences. This makes 3D scene analysis simple.

The whole algorithm could be subdivided into several stages:

Synchronization...