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Method for texturing storage media discs with immobile Cu balls/particles 0.1-0.5 µm using sputter deposition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000030146D
Publication Date: 2004-Jul-29
Document File: 4 page(s) / 147K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for texturing storage media discs with immobile Cu balls/particles 0.1 0.5 µm using sputter deposition. Benefits include improved performance, improved reliability, and improved throughput.

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Method for texturing storage media discs with immobile Cu balls/particles 0.1-0.5 µm using sputter deposition

Disclosed is a method for texturing storage media discs with immobile Cu balls/particles 0.1‑0.5 µm using sputter deposition. Benefits include improved performance, improved reliability, and improved throughput.

Background

      The storage disk industry is growing very rapidly to accommodate the greater than a gigabyte size requirement. As a result, extremely aggressive specifications have been set for the flatness and the distance between the head and disk surface. To continuously increase the storage capacity, the industry must deal with the problem of stiction between the media disk and the head.

      The reliability of storage media, such as CDs, DVDs, and hard disks, can be adversely affected by stiction. It occurs from the very close proximity and contact of the two very smooth/flat surfaces. The conventional solution to the problem is artificially texturing the surface.

      Conventionally, texturing is created by intentional Al hillock formation. Al is deposited under the NiP base layer and heated to form hillocks. However, this process results in a softer bump and uncontrolled particle size (see Figure 1).

      An alternative solution is creating scratch marks using rough tribological material (hardness and melting temperature, see Figures 2 and 3). Another alternative is laser-induced texturing with a bump size of 5-20 µm (see Figure 4). However, this bump size is too big as the media requires increasingly smaller bump sizes.

General description

      The disclosed method is texturing storage media discs with immobile Cu balls/particles having a particle size distribution of 0.1-0.5 µm, using a physical vapor deposition (PVD) technique in a sputtering chamber. The method prevents head-media interface stiction problems.

Advantages

              The disclosed method provides advantages, including:

•             Improved performance due to improving the control of the texturing the media
•             Improved performance due to improving the control of the particle size and th...