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Method of Consistently Deriving the Most Valid Along Hole Depth Estimate Possible From One or More M...

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000030616D
Publication Date: 2004-Aug-19
Document File: 1 page(s) / 10K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Using a common model, quantify the uncertainty associated with each depth measurement system, particularly those used in the acquisition of formation evaluation data. Include the uncertainty estimate with each reported measured depth. Where a feature is logged by more than one system, compare competing measured depths versus their relative uncertainty. (Note, relative not absolute uncertainty). Where the difference in measured depth exceeds what is reasonable, as predicted by the uncertainty model, assume gross error in one or both measurement and initiate investigation. Where agreement is acceptable, select measurement with smallest uncertaitny as definitive depth for feature. Alternatively, calculated weighted average depth, and assign reduced uncertainty based on specification of contributing measurements.

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Using a common model, quantify the uncertainty associated with each depth measurement system, particularly those used in the acquisition of formation evaluation data. Include the uncertainty estimate with each reported measured depth. Where a feature is logged by more than one system, compare competing measured depths versus their relative uncertainty. (Note, relative not absolute uncertainty). Where the difference in measured depth exceeds what is reasonable, as predicted by the uncertainty model, assume gross error in one or both measurement and initiate investigation. Where agreement is acceptable, select measurement with smallest uncertaitny as definitive depth for feature. Alternatively, calculated weighted average depth, and assign reduced uncertainty based on specification of contributing measurements.