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Optimised Channel Rate Switching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000030735D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Aug-24
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Aug-24
Document File: 2 page(s) / 24K

Publishing Venue

Motorola

Related People

Simon Burley: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a method of dynamically selecting a hysteresis period (on a per user basis) for any communication system that permits reconfiguration of the assigned data rate during a particular user’s call/data transfer.

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Optimised Channel Rate Switching

Simon Burley, David Bhatoolaul, Walter Featherstone, Peter Randall

Abstract

In this paper, we propose a method of dynamically selecting a hysteresis period (on a per user basis) for any communication system that permits reconfiguration of the assigned data rate during a particular user’s call/data transfer.

Introduction

In many communication systems, it is possible for the data rate assigned to a particular user to be reconfigured during the course of the call/data transfer. The motivation is to continually ensure that only sufficient resource is assigned from both the user and system perspective. For example, the user is concerned with meeting their Grade of Service (GoS)/Quality of Service (QoS) requirement, whilst the system only has a finite resource to be shared amongst multiple users. In order to fully utilise the available system resource, whilst simultaneously ensuring that each user meets their GoS/QoS requirements, we propose a method of dynamically selecting a hysteresis period (on a per user basis) for any communication system that permits reconfiguration of the assigned data rate during a particular user’s call/data transfer.

Problem(s) To Be Solved

There are a number of disadvantages in triggering a rate reconfiguring of the data rate assigned to a given user too quickly. Firstly, reconfigurations are costly in terms of signalling overhead (i.e. the processing resource consumed in generating, signalling and performing the reconfiguration as well as the bandwidth required in sending the necessary messaging over the communications network). Secondly, too frequent reconfiguration can result in inefficient utilisation of the communication medium resulting from a user being moved to a rate that they do not fully utilise. In the worst case the user will “ping-pong” between high and low rates without check. As a result a compromise must be made between the frequency with which reconfigurations are made and the associated cost. Lastly, widely different user traffic profiles – i.e. the way in which users generate traffic...