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"on-demand-recovery" driven design

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000031027D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Sep-07
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Sep-07
Document File: 1 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

Designing a product that can withstand inadvertent or careless mistakes on the part of users and help them in a quick recovery (without resorting to some sort of backup ) could be a major contribution.

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"on-demand-recovery" driven design

Designing a product that can withstand inadvertent or careless mistakes on the part of users and help them in a quick recovery (without resorting to some sort of backup), could be a major contribution.

There are numerous shortcomings to existing data restoration from backup, but to mention a few:

Data may not be as recent as one might wish (possible loss of a day's work). Restoring from backup (especially a central system) is a time-consuming proposition.

Backup might be corrupted or inaccessible because of infrequent use/validation.

Taking unfortunate but inevitable disastrous incidents into account while designing a product might save the user a lot of grief and expense, and by doing so a company can also save in support costs and can gain its customers' goodwill.

    The 'on-demand-recovery' driven design is more of a mind-set than a specific algorithm and, as such, has different implementations for different products. An example for such a design is provision for an "Undelete" functionality. Removing files under UNIX today results in their resource(s) returning to the free pools. If new files are created, they could get those "just freed" resources (i.e. pages and inodes). If, instead, recently removed files or directory resources were not made readily available to the system but were distributed according to a FirstRemovedFirstAllocated scheme, a recovery operation could be tried (using Undelete tools available in the market) t...