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THERMAL PROTECTION BENEFITS ON HAIR FROM SILICONE CONDITIONING POLYMERS

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000031140D
Publication Date: 2004-Sep-14

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Silicone polymers, in particular the amino-functional silicones, SF 1708 and Silsoft® Tone, are effective thermal protection additives delivered from either a leave-in or a rinse-off vehicle to minimize hair damage caused by high temperature hair styling devices. These polymers are more effective than a high molecular weight silicone gum, SF 1214. This thermal protection benefit cannot be simply explained by deposition alone; spreading, surface coverage and orientation perhaps play significant roles. It is likely that other amino silicone polymers, including silicone quats, would provide similar thermal protection benefits.

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THERMAL PROTECTION BENEFITS ON HAIR

FROM SILICONE CONDITIONING POLYMERS

John Nicholson, Ph.D., GE Advanced Materials-Silicones

Abstract

Silicone polymers, in particular the amino-functional silicones, SF 1708 and Silsoft® Tone, are effective thermal protection additives delivered from either a leave-in or a rinse-off vehicle to minimize hair damage caused by high temperature hair styling devices. These polymers are more effective than a high molecular weight silicone gum, SF 1214.  This thermal protection benefit cannot be simply explained by deposition alone; spreading, surface coverage and orientation perhaps play significant roles. It is likely that other amino silicone polymers, including silicone quats, would provide similar thermal protection benefits.

1.  Background.

High temperature styling devices are commonly used for curling or straightening hair. One example of such a device is a flat ceramic iron, which is used to achieve a hair straightening benefit. These typically operate at temperatures in the range of 140oC – 190oC. One drawback of using these devices is the fact that such high temperatures can be damaging to the hair, in particular with regard to its mechanical properties.

The work reported herein was undertaken in order to determine the extent to which silicone-conditioning agents delivered from shampoos or conditioning products can protect the hair from the damaging effect of these high temperature styling devices. The silicones investigated were: SF1214, a high molecular weight gum (INCI name: Cyclopentasiloxane (and) dimethicone; 15% dimethicone gum in D5); SF1708, an aminofunctional silicone (INCI name:  Amodimethicone); and Silsoft® Tone, a fatty acid salt of a high molecular weight aminofunctional silicone (INCI name: polysilicone-18 cetyl phosphate).

The tensile property of hair was selected as a measure of the extent of thermal damage since this would be expected to correlate with an increase in brittleness, and therefore to its susceptibility to breakage. (L’Oreal have a cartoon of hair breaking as a result of the damaging effects of blow-drying on the back of their Vive product line). The tensile properties of human hair are determined by the cortex (which makes up 75-90% of its bulk), not the cuticle. Thus, surface damage to the cuticles can occur without having any impact on the tensile properties of the hair. However, since damage to the cuticles could make the cortex more vulnerable to various damaging effects, the condition of the cuticles on hair fibers following various thermal treatments, with and without the use of silicone conditioning polymers, could still be highly relevant and so samples of hair were submitted for analysis by electron microscopy.

There are a number of references that provide an overview of the mechanical properties of hair. It has been established that hair passes through three phases upon application of increased force. The first phase is the Hookean region, where the stres...