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Closed Loop Control of Clothes Surface Temperature in Drying

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000031214D
Publication Date: 2004-Sep-17
Document File: 1 page(s) / 75K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

The subject of the invention is the use of an IR (infrared) sensor to measure the temperature of the clothes during the drying process and, using a closed loop feedback system, maintain the temperature of the clothes below the maximum value by controlling the temperature of the air or airflow of the air from the heating coil, thus minimizing the drying time.

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INVENTION DISCLOSURE

Subject: Closed Loop Control of Clothes Surface Temperature in Drying

Sketch and Description:

Conventional clothes dryers use a drum, a heating coil, an air blower, connective ducts and a controls system to dry clothing. Generally the control system is based on operation for a fixed time, or on feedback from sensors measuring the humidity or temperature of the exhaust or conductive probes measuring the "dryness" (relative electrical conductivity) of the clothes. To minimize the drying time, the airflow and temperature of the air leaving the heating coil should be as high as practical without being so high as to cause damage to the clothing being dried. The subject of the invention is the use of an IR (infrared) sensor to measure the temperature of the clothes during the drying process and, using a closed loop feedback system, maintain the temperature of the clothes below the maximum value by controlling the temperature of the air or airflow of the air from the heating coil, thus minimizing the drying time. This arrangement would allow for the user to prescribe (via input controls) or using preset levels, the maximum surface temperature of the clothes and then automatically control the air flow temperature and flow conditions to minimize the drying time. This approach could also be applied to clothes dryer systems where the thermal input is supplied by either direct radiant input (see US Pat 6,088,932) or other means such as microwave radiatio...