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Automotive Vehicle Lamp Using Tungsten Lattice Light Sources

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000031764D
Publication Date: 2004-Oct-08
Document File: 7 page(s) / 119K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Tungsten photonic lattice filaments or tungsten photonic lattice light sources are being developed. These light sources produce less heat, generate more light, and use less energy than contemporary filaments and incandescent light sources. Tungsten photonic lattice based light sources could be used in vehicle applications where incandescent lamps are currently being or could be used. Further, these light sources could be used in place of other types of light sources. Advantages of such light sources may include a smaller need for ventilation and potentially smaller bulb sizes, which would allow for greater design flexibility.

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Automotive Vehicle Lamp Using Tungsten Lattice Light Sources

Abstract

    Tungsten photonic lattice filaments or tungsten photonic lattice light sources are being developed. These light sources produce less heat, generate more light, and use less energy than contemporary filaments and incandescent light sources. Tungsten photonic lattice based light sources could be used in vehicle applications where incandescent lamps are currently being or could be used. Further, these light sources could be used in place of other types of light sources. Advantages of such light sources may include a smaller need for ventilation and potentially smaller bulb sizes, which would allow for greater design flexibility.

Description of the Innovation

Background

    Various vehicle lighting applications such as interior lamps, exterior lamps, and instrument cluster lighting may use incandescent lamps as the source of light. In fact, for many years, incandescent lamps were used as the primary light source for many vehicle applications. Such lamps generally have a relatively higher power usage and tend to produce higher amounts of heat. Other light sources such as LEDs are beginning to be used in vehicle lighting applications, but such light sources have their own disadvantages. It would be desirable to develop additional light sources for use in vehicle applications.

    Tungsten-filament bulbs - the most widely used light source in the world - burn hands if unscrewed while lit. The bulbs are infamous for generating more heat than light. A microscopic tungsten lattice - in effect, a tungsten filament fabricated with an internal crystalline pattern - developed at the Department of Energy's Sandia National Laboratories has been shown to have potential to transmute the majority of this wasted infrared energy (commonly called heat) into the frequencies of visible light. This could raise the efficiency of an incandescent electric bulb from 5 percent to greater than 60 percent.

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    Fabrication of the device was accomplished by an extension of MEMS (microelectromechanical systems) technologies that themselves have been derived from semiconductor technologies. Light bulbs may be formed from these tungsten lattices by placing these tungsten lattices in light bulbs in place of conventional filaments such as solid tungsten filaments. Such light bulbs could potentially be compatible with conventional light bulb connectors.

Summary

    Light sources formed from tungsten photonic lattices could be used in various vehicle lighting applications including, but not limited to task lamps, courtesy lamps, vanity lamps, ambient lamps, orientation lamps, safety lamps, decorative lamps, exterior lamps (headlamps, stop lamps, turn lamps, backup lamps, CHMSL lamps, puddle lamps, running board lamps, fog lamps, DRL lamps, etc.), backlit controls, displays, switches, indicators, or any other vehicular based object that could provide light or be lit. Tungsten photonic lattice based light so...