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A Built-In ATE Power Supply to Control an External Power Supply with Higher Output Power Capability

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000032221D
Publication Date: 2004-Oct-26
Document File: 2 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method which uses a built-in ATE power supply to extend the output power capability of an existing ATE device under test (DUT), while maintaining compatibility with existing test applications interfaces.

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A Built-In ATE Power Supply to Control an External Power Supply with Higher Output Power Capability

Disclosed is a method which uses a built-in ATE power supply to extend the output power capability of an existing ATE device under test (DUT), while maintaining compatibility with existing test applications interfaces.

Background

Current ATE testers have limited upgrade paths and output power capabilities. New power supplies are needed to extend the life of this equipment, and these external power supplies must be controlled by the tester. Most communication links to the tester are slow, negatively impact test time, and complicate the programming of the new supply.

Currently, standard communication links from the tester, such as GPIB or RS232, are used to control external devices (see Figure 1). The programming of the external power supply is done with standard GPIB or RS232 commands. These communication links require new code to be developed and integrated for the new power supply.

General Description

In the disclosed method, the built-in ATE tester power supply is programmed by the user, using existing commands. The resulting output voltage is then sampled and digitized by an A/D. This information is fed to a microcontroller which controls the external power supply. The external power supply then provides power to the DUT (see Figure 2).

The calibration circuit shown in Figure 1 is used to ensure that the correct voltage is programmed to the external power supply, because AT...