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Piezoelectric powered Radio-Frequency Identification tags for disk drives.

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000032274D
Original Publication Date: 2004-Oct-28
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2004-Oct-28
Document File: 1 page(s) / 28K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Abstract

This invention proposes a different approach to powering an RFID tag: rectified voltage where the source of the voltage is a piezoelectric material attached to a part in constant motion. The piezoelectric material is attached in some fashion to the carrier, superstructure, of a disk drive in operation in a computer system.

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THIS COPY WAS MADE FROM AN INTERNAL IBM DOCUMENT AND NOT FROM THE PUBLISHED BOOK

TUC820040085 Jean Barkley/Tucson/IBM

Richard Kisley, Gregg Lucas

Piezoelectric powered Radio-Frequency Identification tags for disk drives .

      Disclosed is a new approach to powering a Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tag: rectified voltage where the source of the voltage is a piezoelectric material attached to a part in constant motion. The piezoelectric material as disclosed is attached in some fashion to the carrier, superstructure, of a disk drive in a computer system . The extra power from the piezoelectric material can be used to extend sensitivity or range of interaction, or for other uses such as more complex processing or writing to its data store.

      Hard disk drives, when in use, are in constant motion. In fact a lot of effort is expended to build enclosures and racks which dampen the accumulated rotational vibration so that the interaction of the aggregated drives does not vibrate the heads off the platters, and to prolong the operational lives of the drives.

      Radio Frequency Identification (RFID) tags, while not new, are rapidly finding new uses and new ways to show usefulness. As they become cheaper they will be used to assist inventory and management of nearly every item which has some value. RFID tags are powered either through internal batteries, for the more complicated read/write tags, or through rectified voltage of the received signal, for the more common passive read-only tags.

      Piezoele...