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Nanoemulsions for Disposable Articles

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000033314D
Publication Date: 2004-Dec-06
Document File: 10 page(s) / 62K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Related People

Jeffrey D. Lindsay: AUTHOR [+2]

Related Documents

US 6,506,803: PATENT [+2]

Abstract

Nanoemulsions including minute oil droplets in an aqueous phase have recently been proposed as effective antimicrobial agents that can have low or substantially zero toxicity. In this paper, the term nanoemulsion refers to a thermodynamically stable emulsion of at least one liquid phase in another liquid phase, with droplets typically about 50 nm to 500 nm in diameter.

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Nanoemulsions for Disposable Articles

Jeff Lindsay and Fung-Jou Chen

Kimberly-Clark Corporation, Neenah, Wisconsin

Introduction

Nanoemulsions including minute oil droplets in an aqueous phase have recently been proposed as effective antimicrobial agents that can have low or substantially zero toxicity. In this paper, the term nanoemulsion refers to a thermodynamically stable emulsion of at least one liquid phase in another liquid phase, with droplets typically about 50 nm to 500 nm in diameter.

Nanoemulsions have also been proposed as effective drug delivery vehicles, or as agents that can directly provide skin health and other benefits. Nanoemulsions for cleaning, disinfecting, and other purposes are now offered commercially under the EcoTru® brand of EnviroSystems, Inc. (San Jose, California). They are also offered by NanoBio Corporation (Ann Arbor, Michigan).

We propose that such materials and related nanoemulsions or microemulsions can be applied to a variety of personal care products to deliver enhanced product performance. Such products can include personal care articles, absorbent garments, and absorbent articles in general. Such articles and garments can include diapers, disposable training pants, sanitary napkins, pantiliners, incontinence products, surgical gowns, face masks, disposable gloves, bed pads, poultry and meat pads, foot pads, sweat absorbent pads, absorbent articles in general, disposable clothing in general, disposable cleaning products such as sponges and wipes, and so forth. The nanoemulsions can be applied topically or in other ways previously contemplated for application of lotions, creams, petrolatum compositions, other emulsions, and a variety of skin wellness additives to absorbent articles and disposable garments.

Background

Nanoemulsions have recently received increased attention due to the work of Dr. James Baker at the University of Michigan (U-M), director of U-M's Center for Biologic Nanotechnology, who has demonstrated their effectiveness against many microbes. Nanoemulsions and associated technology are described, by way of example, in the following documents:

* US Pat. No. 6,506,803, "Methods of Preventing and Treating Microbial Infections," issued Jan. 14, 2003 to Baker et al.
* US Pat. No. 6,559,189, "Non-Toxic Antimicrobial Compositions and Methods of Use," issued May 6, 2003 to Baker et al.
* US Pat. No. 6,635,676, "Non-Toxic Antimicrobial Compositions and Methods of Use," issued Oct. 21, 2003 to Baker et al.
* PCT publication WO 01/49296, "Antimicrobial Compositions and Methods of Use," published July 12, 2001 by J.R. Baker, Jr., et al.
* PCT publication WO 03/00243, "Antimicrobial Nanoemulsion Compositions and Methods," published Jan. 3, 2003 by T. Hamouda et al.
* The Website for the Center for Biologic Nanotechnology at www.nano.med.umich.edu, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, as viewed Feb. 18, 2004.
* T. Hamouda, et al., "A Novel Surfactant Nanoemulsion with Broad-Spectrum Sporici...