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Fabrication of conductive patterns and islands on flexible polymer film by ink-jet printing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000033708D
Publication Date: 2004-Dec-23
Document File: 3 page(s) / 94K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

This invention desribes a method to deposit directly conducting materials onto substrates through ink-jet printing. Conducting inks such as Baytron in water are used to form isolated conducting dots on glass and Mylar film. These dots have conducitivity in the range of 10e-3 to 10e-5 Scm-1. The dot size is ranging from 0.5mm to 1mm which can be easily controlled by changing the droplet volume. In addition, several droplets can be printed in close proximity to form conducting lines. This direct printing method is flexible and fast, also it is amenable to a continuous process.

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Fabrication of conductive patterns and islands on flexible polymer film by ink-jet printing

An important element in electrical wand addressing of digital document media is the conducting electrode on the writing side which contains isolated islands of the conducting materials. These conducting island condense the electric field from the wand to switch the underneath display materials. Currently, subtraction methods such as laser abalation and photolithography have been used to etch an ITO (indium-tin oxide) coating on substrates. A grid-like pattern of ITO is selectively removed to form the island ITO surface (Scheme 1). These coated substrates are expensive and each substrate has to processed individually, so the process is time consuming. In addition, changing the process parameter is not easy for example because a new lithographic mask is needed to change the island size.

This invention desribes an addition method to deposit directly conducting materials onto substrates through ink-jet printing. Conducting inks such as Baytron in water are used to form isolated conducting dots on glass and Mylar film. These dots have conducitivity in the range of 10e-3 to 10e-5 Scm-1. The dot size is ranging from 0.5mm to 1mm which can be easily controlled by changing the droplet volume. In addition, several droplets can be printed in close proximity to form conducting lines. This direct printing method is flexible and fast, also it is amenable to a continuous process.

The ink described in this invention is a Baytron P solution from Bayer. Baytron P is an blue aqueous dispersion of the intrinsically conductive polymer PEDOT/PSS [poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrene sulfonate)]. This solution has a relative low viscosity (60 – 100 mPa·s) which is suitable for ink jet printing. Other conducting polymer solutions such as polythiophene, polypyrrole, polyaniline with a similar viscosity can also be used. Another criteria for good resolution of dot formation is the substrate ability to absorb ink. Tests on different substrates (glass, Mylar, ink-jet transparency) show that the ink-jet t...