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Capillary Holes to Prevent Condensed Water from Depositing on Sheet After Fusing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000033725D
Publication Date: 2004-Dec-23
Document File: 1 page(s) / 8K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Fusing of substrate during electrophotographic copying or printing releases water vapor. When the machine is cold at cold start, vapor condenses on the cold baffles as the paper moves through the machine. Water droplets grow in size and find its way to the back of the sheet. During two sided copying or printing, the water can be re-deposited on the Photoreceptor. Residue from the water creates a film on the Photoreceptor causing image deletions.

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Capillary Holes to Prevent Condensed Water from Depositing on Sheet After Fusing

Fusing of substrate during electrophotographic copying or printing releases water vapor.  When the machine is cold at cold start, vapor condenses on the cold baffles as the paper moves through the machine.  Water droplets grow in size and find its way to the back of the sheet.  During two sided copying or printing, the water can be re-deposited on the Photoreceptor.  Residue from the water creates a film on the Photoreceptor causing image deletions.

As the machine warms up, the baffle surfaces gets hot and the condensation is reduced. When condensation is a problem in fusing, it can be handled by introducing a fan to scavenge the moist air away from cold surfaces.

As the water condenses on the decurler baffle, the droplet size grows and the drops become large enough either to drop on the sheet back or the sheet will touch contact the baffle and carry some of the condensed water to the photorepector. By introducing capillary holes in the top decurler baffle, water will get sucked in these holes and the size of the droplets will not grow large. The holes act like a storage for the water until the baffles are heated up (usually within 250-300 sheets) and vapor does not condense any more.