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Method for a conformal transmission line differential balun on FCPGA/FCBGA packages for narrow-band wireless communication

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000033856D
Publication Date: 2004-Dec-30
Document File: 3 page(s) / 35K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for a conformal transmission line differential balun on flip-chip ball-grid array (FCBGA) and flip-chip plastic-grid array (FCPGA) packages for narrow-band wireless communication. Benefits include improved performance and improved ease of manufacturing.

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Method for a conformal transmission line differential balun on FCPGA/FCBGA packages for narrow-band wireless communication

Disclosed is a method for a conformal transmission line differential balun on flip-chip ball-grid array (FCBGA) and flip-chip plastic-grid array (FCPGA) packages for narrow-band wireless communication. Benefits include improved performance and improved ease of manufacturing.

Background

      Balanced input and outputs are one of the key segments for wireless communication. Conventional balun structures are built on die. However, because die metal-layer thickness is very limited, the loss is typically quite large. To avoid this metal loss, multiple metal layers must be used, increasing the die area. Conventional balun designs use stacked spiral inductors because this type of design is the most compacted. However, this type of construction introduces high parastics and accepts more noise from nearby designs (see Figure 1).

      As frequency increases (for example, higher than 5 GHz), a transmission line on a package is  long enough to perform the balun role with conformal structures (see Figure 2). For some small packages, however, this type of design may still exceed the package size limit.

      An on-die baluns do not have good performance due to high metal losses. On-die baluns must use spiral inductor coupling due to die-size limits, which introduce unavoidable noise. Spiral inductors introduce high manufacturing errors on very thick copper layers.

      Conventionally, these problems are solved by low performance and extra die area (extra cost).

Description

      The disclosed method is narrow band differential balanced outputs (...