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Forty Five Degree Optical Fiber Cut and Mirror Polish to Re-Direct Light in a Printed Circuit Board Substrate

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000033869D
Publication Date: 2004-Dec-30
Document File: 3 page(s) / 38K

Publishing Venue

The IP.com Prior Art Database

Abstract

Disclosed is a method for using an optical fiber to re-direct light down a hole in the PCB. The fiber is severed at a 45o angle, polished, and mirrored to reflect down the severed end of the fiber. Benefits include a solution that eliminates impedance and power issues, and produces less noise than the current state of the art.

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Forty Five Degree Optical Fiber Cut and Mirror Polish to Re-Direct Light in a Printed Circuit Board Substrate

Disclosed is a method for using an optical fiber to re-direct light down a hole in the PCB. The fiber is severed at a 45o angle, polished, and mirrored to reflect down the severed end of the fiber. Benefits include a solution that eliminates impedance and power issues, and produces less noise than the current state of the art.

Background

Current methods for directing light via a fiber rely on mirrors at a pre-set angle, fixed to a light transmitting pins or fibers of a fixed length (see Figure 1). Currently, fiber optic technology is not used in PCBs; all transmission is by electrons through copper or other conductive metals.

General Description

The following are the stages for creating the disclosed method:

1.      Drill a hole to access the optical fiber embedded in the resin substrate. The drill bit should be 45o at the tip (similar to the counter sink drill bit used for screw heads), and a depth control setting is required (see Figure 2). The depth of the fiber, the tolerance on the depth of the drill, and the length of the 45o tip are factors controlled in assuring the fiber is cut at 45o

2.      Use plating or metallization to form a small tube in the drilled hole, so when light is introduced into the hole the resin will not cause it to diffuse or refract (see Figure 3).

3.      Expose the optical fiber by removing the copper (see Figure 4).

4.      The optical fiber is now in two parts: the part that will reflect the light, and the section that the light will travel through.  Use a laser to...