Browse Prior Art Database

Linear Solder Anvil Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034189D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 43K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Carver, WF: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is an assembly which is used to remove excess solder off 12 mm Metallized Ceramic Flush Pin Substrates using the Impact Tinning process. This assembly is a linear-driven solder anvil, replacing the rotary driven anvil that was built to begin the program. A straight cylinder 1 is used to bring the anvil 5 to the "hit" position from the "home" position. By using the straight cylinder, it puts the anvil in the same position every time for the tinning racks to hit against. It eliminates the requirement that the operator make numerous alignment adjustments to the assembly to keep it in the right position for the tinning racks to hit against. The straight cylinder is magnetic, which allows the position switches 2 to be activated by the magnet in the cylinder.

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Linear Solder Anvil Assembly

Disclosed is an assembly which is used to remove excess solder off 12 mm Metallized Ceramic Flush Pin Substrates using the Impact Tinning process. This assembly is a linear-driven solder anvil, replacing the rotary driven anvil that was built to begin the program. A straight cylinder 1 is used to bring the anvil 5 to the "hit" position from the "home" position. By using the straight cylinder, it puts the anvil in the same position every time for the tinning racks to hit against. It eliminates the requirement that the operator make numerous alignment adjustments to the assembly to keep it in the right position for the tinning racks to hit against. The straight cylinder is magnetic, which allows the position switches 2 to be activated by the magnet in the cylinder. The rods 4 are used to keep the anvil 5 in the same plane when the tinning racks are hit against it. The anvil does not rotate around the cylinder shaft. The plate 6 is at an angle to have the cylinder retract below the level required for the tinning racks to pass over the assembly when it is in the "home" position. A cover 3 was built to go over the linear anvil assembly to protect it from the environment produced by the process. When the tinning rack gets in position the tinner computer tells the cylinder to extend the anvil to the "hit" position. When it becomes extended, the switch is made, telling the computer to start the racks hitting against the anvil. After the hitti...