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Speech-Synthesis Telephone Call Annunciator

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034223D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 96K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Ashton, GJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby a speech-synthesis telephone call annunciator replaces the bell of a telephone so as to convey more informational content. Also, described is a stand-alone module annunciator which can be used with or without a telephone being present. (Image Omitted) The primary intent of utilizing a speech-synthesis annunciator (SSA) to replace the bell and/or visual indicators, such as flashing lights, is to convey more information. For example, in multiple input telephone lines, a different message can be programmed for each line. Also, the SSA offers potentially more pleasing sounds than is produced from a harsh ringer. A voice conveying information through the SSA may be either male or female.

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Speech-Synthesis Telephone Call Annunciator

A technique is described whereby a speech-synthesis telephone call annunciator replaces the bell of a telephone so as to convey more informational content. Also, described is a stand-alone module annunciator which can be used with or without a telephone being present.

(Image Omitted)

The primary intent of utilizing a speech-synthesis annunciator (SSA) to replace the bell and/or visual indicators, such as flashing lights, is to convey more information. For example, in multiple input telephone lines, a different message can be programmed for each line. Also, the SSA offers potentially more pleasing sounds than is produced from a harsh ringer. A voice conveying information through the SSA may be either male or female. Applications for the SSA are more adaptable to multiple input lines than single input lines, as would typically be used in an office environment. The SSA has the ability to differentiate a call so that a verbal message can indicate who the call is for, such as "Telephone call for Mr. Smith" or "Telephone call - to answer push button 3 on the telephone". This is provided through the implementation of custom message features. In this case, the keyboard pad can be used to program the custom message, using a text-to-speech synthesizer. However, it should be noted that the SSA can be used without a telephone being present, only access to the telephone input line is necessary. This enables the SSA to be used in remote locations, where users may not wish to have a telephone, but need to know when a call is coming in. In applications where many telephones are in close proximity to each other, the SSA provides the means of different voice selections, such as a deep-pitched male voice, a medium-pitched male voice, a medium-pitched female voice or a high-pitched female voice. It is designed to be either encased in a telephone enclosure, as shown in Fig. 1, or as a separate module, as shown in Fig. 2. In both cases, the SSA conforms to all the requirements, such as the input impedance, and is powered from the telephone input lines. When a call is received, the AC ringer voltage is rectified by means of a diode bridge, filtered by means of a capacitor and then used to power the SSA. The SSA need not be the typical text-to-speech variety synthesizer, since only a limited number of pre- recorded utterances are available. Instead, the SSA incorporates a digital speech processor (DSP) chip and a speech read-only memory, a digital-to- analog converter, a low-pass filter and an audio amplifier. Since the SSA requires only a limited vocabulary, the amount of memory needed to store the electronic speech is reduced by removing re...