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Super-Atom Structures

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034233D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 53K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Brodsky, MH: AUTHOR

Abstract

Arrays of super-atoms can be constructed with choices of atomic potentials, sizes, geometries and arrangements to provide new materials with designable electronic properties. A super-atom is formed as a solid-state structure, as shown in Fig. 1, in which material, such as gallium arsenide, is a closed quantum well 1 having a core 2 and surrounding material 3 above, below and in the same plane, such as an alloy of aluminum gallium arsenide. Electron orbits of quantum well 1 then become quantized carriers due to GaAs thickness and the closed path in the conduction band and form planar orbits. These orbits apply equally to holes in the valence band. (Image Omitted) The sets of planar orbits produce special properties analogous to atomic m-states of atomic orbitals with angular momenta quantum number 1.

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Super-Atom Structures

Arrays of super-atoms can be constructed with choices of atomic potentials, sizes, geometries and arrangements to provide new materials with designable electronic properties. A super-atom is formed as a solid-state structure, as shown in Fig. 1, in which material, such as gallium arsenide, is a closed quantum well 1 having a core 2 and surrounding material 3 above, below and in the same plane, such as an alloy of aluminum gallium arsenide. Electron orbits of quantum well 1 then become quantized carriers due to GaAs thickness and the closed path in the conduction band and form planar orbits. These orbits apply equally to holes in the valence band.

(Image Omitted)

The sets of planar orbits produce special properties analogous to atomic m- states of atomic orbitals with angular momenta quantum number 1. Core 2 is analogous to the nucleus of an atom and enables versatility of design; for example, the charge on the core can be varied to change the central attractive or repulsive potential for a core with conduction band electrons in the orbitals, as shown in Fig. 2. Orbitals 5 are quantized energy levels in relation to the charge on core 2. Line 6 shows the screened coulombic potential. The super-atoms can be arranged in the arrays of Figs. 3 and 4 to provide new electronic materials. In Fig. 3, a voltage V is applied across a planar array of super-atoms designed to control conduction properties. Varying the center-to-center distance changes insu...