Browse Prior Art Database

Glass Fiber Pull Test Method

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034283D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Jan-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 63K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Barringer, DR: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

Glass fiber used in fiber-optic jumpers is easily damaged during stripping, handling, wiping, exposure to airborne abrasives, etc. Flaws on the surface of glass fibers create regions of high stress concentration. During thermal cycling, stresses at these regions can exceed the ultimate strength of the material and cause the fiber to break. Additionally, in the presence of humidity, the flaws can grow, leading to latent failure of the fiber. This pull test method involves the insertion of stripping and chemically cleaned glass fiber into a rigid glass capillary filled with ultraviolet (UV) cure adhesive (Figs. 1 and 2). The sample is then exposed to a concentrated UV source to cure the adhesive. The sample can now be pull tested to failure using a pull testing device and appropriate fixturing (Fig. 3).

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
At least one non-text object (such as an image or picture) has been suppressed.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 75% of the total text.

Page 1 of 2

Glass Fiber Pull Test Method

Glass fiber used in fiber-optic jumpers is easily damaged during stripping, handling, wiping, exposure to airborne abrasives, etc. Flaws on the surface of glass fibers create regions of high stress concentration. During thermal cycling, stresses at these regions can exceed the ultimate strength of the material and cause the fiber to break. Additionally, in the presence of humidity, the flaws can grow, leading to latent failure of the fiber. This pull test method involves the insertion of stripping and chemically cleaned glass fiber into a rigid glass capillary filled with ultraviolet (UV) cure adhesive (Figs. 1 and 2). The sample is then exposed to a concentrated UV source to cure the adhesive. The sample can now be pull tested to failure using a pull testing device and appropriate fixturing (Fig. 3). A small universal joint was developed to reduce fiber stresses resulting from misalignment during pulling. A split mandrel uses the excess fiber to anchor the sample for pulling.

(Image Omitted)

A precision fixture (Fig. 4) was developed to accurately control the insertion and alignment of the fiber in the capillary. It features a precision spring-loaded slider to which self-centering fiber-holding "fingers" are attached. Similar "fingers" are attached to a stationary standoff to hold the glass capillary. First, the glass capillary is inserted into the "fingers" attached to the standoff and filled with UV- cured adhesive using a pressuri...