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Screen Format for a Basic Audio Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034319D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 6 page(s) / 130K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Penn, SC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

A screen format is described which provides simple operation for a basic audio editor while still allowing a natural growth path for additional functions. An audio editor has been conceptualized that utilizes several levels of zooming to display digitized audio objects containing multiple tracks. As an initial step an editor has been designed to simplify this concept and implement a platform on which to build a basic editor and allow for expansion to the full function editor originally conceptualized. This basic audio editor will initially use only a single level of audio display and support single track audio objects. The screen formats required for this entry level editor are shown below. The initial screen shown in Fig. 1 allows the user to select or create the audio object to be processed (e.g., captured, edited, etc.).

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Screen Format for a Basic Audio Editor

A screen format is described which provides simple operation for a basic audio editor while still allowing a natural growth path for additional functions. An audio editor has been conceptualized that utilizes several levels of zooming to display digitized audio objects containing multiple tracks. As an initial step an editor has been designed to simplify this concept and implement a platform on which to build a basic editor and allow for expansion to the full function editor originally conceptualized. This basic audio editor will initially use only a single level of audio display and support single track audio objects. The screen formats required for this entry level editor are shown below. The initial screen shown in Fig. 1 allows the user to select or create the audio object to be processed (e.g., captured, edited, etc.). This screen allows the user to initiate the editing of an audio object and also allows the user to select a new object during the editing operation. This could be to access some audio to be combined with the audio object originally being edited. Once the proper object is selected, the single editing screen is displayed and looks as shown in Fig. 2 after some sequence of editing operations.

(Image Omitted)

The screen shown in Fig. 2 displays the necessary control information at the top of the screen, the audio object itself in the center of the screen and the prompting and message information at the bottom of the screen. The markers are shown above the audio object and the audio cursor (ACR) directly below that with the 30 second time line below that. At the bottom of the display is the prompt area with the message line below that. In this screen each audio segment (directly addressable piece of digitized audio) is shown with a vertical line.

The highlighted section between the marks "1" and "2" represents a currently defined block. Fig. 3 is the same screen shown with the alternate set of prompts. A volume setting for each audio segment may be represented by the length of the vertical line or by using clipping indicators, such as two dots above the volume information to indicate that the Analog-to- Digital Converter was overrun during the capture of the audio. To allow the user a wide variety of methods of moving the active audio position (audio cursor or ACR) around in an audio object, it is desirable to accommodate the user in whatever natural way he/she is thinking about the problem at the moment. In a simplified or basic audio editor, a variety of techniques modeled somewhat, but not limited to, those found in most text editors or word processors, are employed. It should be noted that the audio is displayed in 30 second chunks on the display; thus, the user can view chunks starting at 00:00, 00:30, 01:30, 02:00 etc. At any given time one of four display areas is active for the purpose of positioning the ACR. These areas are accessed by using the "Enter" or Down cursor...