Browse Prior Art Database

Method of Automatic Audio Marking and Insertion of Canned Audio for Basic Audio Editor

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034322D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 7 page(s) / 220K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Penn, SC: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The editing of digitized audio requires reference points. They can be user generated in a full function editor, but in a basic editor, a more simplified approach is needed to reduce implementation cost and complexity of use. An audio editor utilizes user-identified time points (marks) within the audio object to support a wide variety of positioning, editing and merging operations. The following describes many of the basic positioning aids to be implemented without the associated implementation complexity. The audio editor will generate and maintain a minimal set of marks within the audio object that will support the basic positioning and editing operations. The set of marks selected are as follows: 1. "S" = Start of audio object, always fixed prior to the first audio segment (i.e., segment 0).

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Method of Automatic Audio Marking and Insertion of Canned Audio for Basic Audio Editor

The editing of digitized audio requires reference points. They can be user generated in a full function editor, but in a basic editor, a more simplified approach is needed to reduce implementation cost and complexity of use. An audio editor utilizes user-identified time points (marks) within the audio object to support a wide variety of positioning, editing and merging operations. The following describes many of the basic positioning aids to be implemented without the associated implementation complexity. The audio editor will generate and maintain a minimal set of marks within the audio object that will support the basic positioning and editing operations. The set of marks selected are as follows: 1. "S" = Start of audio object, always fixed prior to the first

audio segment (i.e., segment 0). Note: An audio

segment is the smallest addressable element of the

audio object (e.g., 0.4 seconds in the following

examples).

2. "E" = End of audio object, always positioned following the

last audio segment (i.e., segment n).

(Image Omitted)

3. "R" = Start position of last record

operation, prior to the

first audio segment of the last recorded audio

material within the audio object.

4. "P" = Start position of last play operation, prior to first

audio segment of the last played audio material

within the audio object.

(Image Omitted)

5. "X" = Position of last stop or copy

operation, always posi tioned following the

last audio segment played, recorded or copied. If

necessary this symbol could be replaced with three

distinct symbols one marking the last stop for a

record operation, one marking the last stop of a

play operation and one marking the end of the last

copy operation. Current indication is that a

single value is adequate for user operations and

thus has been selected for the initial

implementation in keeping with the desire to have

the interface as simple as possible.

(Image Omitted)

6. "1" = position of the first entered audio block definition

point. This mark will either precede the initial

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audio segment of the block or follow the last

audio segment of the block depending on whether or

not this position precedes or follows, in time

sequence, the ending block position.

7. "2" = position of the last (second) entered audio block

definition point. This mark will either follow the last

audio segment of the block or precede the first

audio segment of the block depending on whether or

not this position follows or precedes, in time

sequence, the initially entered block position.

(Image Omitted)

The above symbols were chosen to be supportable on both graphic and character

displays, but, in fact, any symbol choice could be

made to represent these points. Fig. 1A shows how these system-generated marks would look when the audio editor is initiated. After a record operation capturing 20 seconds of audio, the display with its marks would look as sh...