Browse Prior Art Database

Chuck for Automatic Wafer Processing

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034333D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 83K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gasper, A: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

This article describes a universal design chuck which can be used in a number of measurement and inspection machines to hold a 125 mm diameter wafer in accurate position during processing. A silicone wafer goes through many machines during its manufacturing process. All of these steps are done in a class 100 room environment. Some of these machines do measurements on features of microscopic size, and other machines do inspection for contaminants. The chuck disclosed herein is designed to hold the wafer on the machine (Image Omitted) while the measurement or inspection is being done. The wafer is handled many times as it goes from one machine to another during processing. It is important that the wafer be handled with care to prevent edge chipping breaking into pieces. Fig.

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Chuck for Automatic Wafer Processing

This article describes a universal design chuck which can be used in a number of measurement and inspection machines to hold a 125 mm diameter wafer in accurate position during processing. A silicone wafer goes through many machines during its manufacturing process. All of these steps are done in a class 100 room environment. Some of these machines do measurements on features of microscopic size, and other machines do inspection for contaminants. The chuck disclosed herein is designed to hold the wafer on the machine

(Image Omitted)

while the measurement or inspection is being done. The wafer is handled many times as it goes from one machine to another during processing. It is important that the wafer be handled with care to prevent edge chipping breaking into pieces. Fig. 1 is a top view showing a wafer 1 resting on chuck 2 in the clamped state. Fig. 2 is a cross-section along line A-A of Fig. 1. The wafer is roughly placed on top of the chuck by a wafer handler which automatically loads and unloads wafers. The chuck is made of stainless steel to prevent contamination of the wafer. A clamp 4 is spring loaded towards the wafer by spring 7 which exerts a controlled force on the wafer. The clamp force is counteracted by an eccentric cam 6 until the wafer is fully located against V-notch locater pin 8. As the wafer slides into position, it is located between two pins on the clamp and the V-notch locator pin. In the closed positio...