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Application of Computer to the Kinetic Analysis of DOCUMENT Transport

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034367D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Crawford, JL: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

This article describes the application of an IBM 1620 II Computer to the Kinetical Analysis of a card document transport. The skew, incremental velocity, and jitter with respect to an emitter of a card moving through the transport at 100 inches per second was determined. The above parameters were measured by recording the time at which the leading and trailing edges of punched holes passed a reference point in the (Image Omitted) read station and also by recording the time of occurrence of a transport emitter count. The computer was used as a high-speed data collection and analysis tool. To record the required times, a two-channel buffer was caused to sample the output of a counter which was driven by a 100 KHz oscillator. The buffer then transferred the data to the core of the IBM 1620 II Computer.

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Application of Computer to the Kinetic Analysis of DOCUMENT Transport

This article describes the application of an IBM 1620 II

Computer to the Kinetical Analysis of a card document transport. The skew, incremental velocity, and jitter with respect to an emitter of a card moving through the transport at 100 inches per second was determined. The above parameters were measured by recording the time at which the leading and trailing edges of punched holes passed a reference point in the

(Image Omitted)

read station and also by recording the time of occurrence of a transport emitter count. The computer was used as a high-speed data collection and analysis tool. To record the required times, a two-channel buffer was caused to sample the output of a counter which was driven by a 100 KHz oscillator. The buffer then transferred the data to the core of the IBM 1620 II Computer. Two channels were required to discriminate between hole edges and emitter time. The card velocity of 100 inches per second and the clock rate of 100 KHz resulted in a spatial resolution of 0.001 inches. Six decimal digits were required to uniquely define the discrete sample points occurring within the time to process 100 cards. The data from a burst of 100 transported cards with 18 holes per card resulted in 32,400 digits being stored within 4 seconds. The analysis of the data was performed using the FORTRAN

(Image Omitted)

language with the use of an assembly language subroutine for the control of the data collection task. The power gained through the flexibility of this on-line software analysis was demonstrated when initial results indicated a need for different data, and this was quickly accomplished by a program change. The ability to uniquely measure, within 0.001 inch, the location of every hole with respect to an emitter pulse, on 100 cards, under normal operating conditions provided information that was not available by any other known measuring technique.

(Image Omitted)

An IBM 1620 II Computer was used to determine the skew, incremental velocity, and jitter, with respect to an emitter, of a card moving through a transport at 100 inches/second. This was done by recording the time when the leading and trailing edges of the punched holes passed a reference point in the read station, and by recording the occurrence of a transport emitter count. A two-channel buffer sampled the output of a counter driven by a 100 KHz oscillator. (Two channels were needed to discriminate between hole edges and emitter time.) The buffer transferred the

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data to the 1620's core storage. The 100-inch/second card velocity and 100 KHz clock rate resulted in a spatial resolution of 0.001 inch. Six decimal digits were used to uniquely define the discrete sample points occurring while processing 100, 18-hole cards. The data from the cards resulted in 32,400 digits being stored within 4 seconds. FORTRAN, with an assembly language subroutine, was used to analyze the data. T...