Browse Prior Art Database

Submillimeter Nozzles for Laser-Jet Plating and Etching

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034370D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 31K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kahn, WA: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Laser-jet plating and etching is described in U.S. Patent 4,497,692 which also includes a brief description of a glass nozzle that can be used in the laser-jet plating/etching cell to make patterns on the order of 500 microns in diameter. As the need for smaller nozzles arises, it becomes more difficult to use a glassed-on nozzle. This articles describes a nozzle made from platinum which can be used to plate laser-jet gold spots with a diameter on the order of 50-100 microns. In this configuration, the plate from which the nozzle is formed also serves as the anode, thus eliminating a separate component from the previously described laser-jet plating cell. In the present scheme, forming the nozzle from the anode plate and using smaller diameters permits a much shorter nozzle throat.

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Submillimeter Nozzles for Laser-Jet Plating and Etching

Laser-jet plating and etching is described in U.S. Patent 4,497,692 which also includes a brief description of a glass nozzle that can be used in the laser-jet plating/etching cell to make patterns on the order of 500 microns in diameter. As the need for smaller nozzles arises, it becomes more difficult to use a glassed-on nozzle. This articles describes a nozzle made from platinum which can be used to plate laser-jet gold spots with a diameter on the order of 50-100 microns. In this configuration, the plate from which the nozzle is formed also serves as the anode, thus eliminating a separate component from the previously described laser-jet plating cell. In the present scheme, forming the nozzle from the anode plate and using smaller diameters permits a much shorter nozzle throat. Thus, thin material can be used which is mechanically drilled. Whereas drilling through thick material leaves a very poor surface quality to the hole periphery which results in poor jet formation, the thin material in conjunction with high-speed drilling results in a fairly smooth surface. This makes it possible to obtain a small diameter nozzle with good jet formation. An important feature of this configuration is that it makes it possible to minimize the distance between anode and sample. Thus, it becomes possible to maximize the current for a given voltage by minimizing the jet stream resistance (which is proportional to length...