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Seeding With Metal-Organic Compounds Via Laser Pyrolysis

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034389D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Park, JM: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Seeding is an extremely important function for plating to obtain the desired metallic patterns. It has been reported previously that the metal acetyl acetonates (metal Ac-Ac) can be successfully used in the gas phase to pattern metal lines in arbitrary patterns both with and without the use of masks. This has been achieved in two ways with both copper and gold Ac-Ac. If a sufficiently strong laser beam intensity is used, one that is absorbed on the surface of the substrate to be patterned, the gaseous molecules will dissociate pyrolytically, leaving behind the metal atom or metal oxide molecule. Alternatively, but less successfully, an appropriate laser wavelength can be chosen (in the UV) to photochemically dissociate the molecule.

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Seeding With Metal-Organic Compounds Via Laser Pyrolysis

Seeding is an extremely important function for plating to obtain the desired metallic patterns. It has been reported previously that the metal acetyl acetonates (metal Ac-Ac) can be successfully used in the gas phase to pattern metal lines in arbitrary patterns both with and without the use of masks. This has been achieved in two ways with both copper and gold Ac-Ac. If a sufficiently strong laser beam intensity is used, one that is absorbed on the surface of the substrate to be patterned, the gaseous molecules will dissociate pyrolytically, leaving behind the metal atom or metal oxide molecule. Alternatively, but less successfully, an appropriate laser wavelength can be chosen (in the UV) to photochemically dissociate the molecule. The disadvantage of this type of deposition is that it has to be made in a vacuum and requires careful control of both the gas pressure and the laser intensity. The deposition rate is also relatively slow. Organo Pd compounds, such as Pd-AcAc, can be successfully used to coat a substrate such as glass. Following the coating, which consists of dipping the substrate in the Pd-AcAc solution and air drying at 80oC in an oven, an argon laser is used to pyrolyze the dry compound in arbitrary patterns. Lines widths of 20 - 50 um resulted depending on laser intensity. The Pd that is left behind acts as an excellent seed for subsequent copper plating from an electroless copper solution....