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Negative Ion Effects by Sputtering

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034423D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 52K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dinger, T: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

The effects of negative ions and secondary electrons on the deposition of highly ionic compounds in magnetized plasmas is known. These effects can cause deposited compositions of YBaCuO to be deficient in high sputter yield elements (i.e., Cu and Ba). To eliminate these effects the wafer samples are positioned just out of the negative ion impact zone (head-on with the plasma gun), in an RF magnetron reactive sputtering system (see figure). The wafers on a heated substrate holder are held close to the RF gun source, but immersed in the high ionization plasma region (just above the dark space shield) which also helps in the dissociation of oxygen (exciting atomic oxygen) with the surface of the wafer facing the target.

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Negative Ion Effects by Sputtering

The effects of negative ions and secondary electrons on the deposition of highly ionic compounds in magnetized plasmas is known. These effects can cause deposited compositions of YBaCuO to be deficient in high sputter yield elements
(i.e., Cu and Ba). To eliminate these effects the wafer samples are positioned just out of the negative ion impact zone (head-on with the plasma gun), in an RF magnetron reactive sputtering system (see figure). The wafers on a heated substrate holder are held close to the RF gun source, but immersed in the high ionization plasma region (just above the dark space shield) which also helps in the dissociation of oxygen (exciting atomic oxygen) with the surface of the wafer facing the target. To obtain a uniform thickness of the thin film, it is necessary to rotate the wafer about its axis of symmetry during deposition. Uniform film composition is also obtained and very close to the single phase 90 K bulk superconducting samples, which are slightly Cu-rich. With the appropriate heat treatment, these films become superconducting.

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