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Method of Analyzing the Carbon Contamination of Thin Insulating Layers

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034452D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Feb-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Faix, W: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

As the integration density of semiconductor devices increases, it becomes extremely difficult to fabricate and monitor the quality of very thin insulating layers measuring less than 10 nm. The layer material generally used is silicon nitride which is suitable for a wide range of applications. Presently, there are no fast measuring methods for monitoring the quality of such thin layers during the production of semiconductor devices. The measuring method described below serves to determine the carbon concentration in thin silicon nitride layers.

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Method of Analyzing the Carbon Contamination of Thin Insulating Layers

As the integration density of semiconductor devices increases, it becomes extremely difficult to fabricate and monitor the quality of very thin insulating layers measuring less than 10 nm. The layer material generally used is silicon nitride which is suitable for a wide range of applications. Presently, there are no fast measuring methods for monitoring the quality of such thin layers during the production of semiconductor devices. The measuring method described below serves to determine the carbon concentration in thin silicon nitride layers. According to the state of the art, using a temperature of 770oC, a total pressure of 220 mbar, a gas flow of 132 sccm at a ratio of SiH2Cl2 to NH3 of 10:1, LPCVD (Low-Pressure Chemical Vapor Deposition) silicon nitride is grown to a thickness of 30 nm on an SiO2 layer which is also 30 nm thick. Carbon contamination during the Si3N4 process occurs in response to the introduction of C2HCl3 at flow rates of 6, 12 and 24 sccm at a uniform total pressure. Then, the Si3N4/SiO2 double layers are analyzed and evaluated, using an Auger electron spectrometer or a similar analyzing means. Evaluation of the layer profiles shows that the carbon contamination in Si3N4 and the nitrogen concentration at the Si/SiO2 interface are correlated. A double logarithmic curve shows the linear relation of the two measuring values. As the N-intensity decreases, the C- intensity de...