Browse Prior Art Database

Host Management of Shared Updaters

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034490D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 57K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Berg, MK: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

Supporting shared updaters for PC files using a construct which has a Directory and members, such as a library, partitioned data set, or folder, is achieved by blending the use of Process Wide Area (PWA) workspaces and System Wide Area (SWA) workspaces. (Image Omitted) PWA, the least expensive of the two types of workspaces, is used wherever possible to support a single updater in an environment which permits shared updating. When a second updater requests a member already in use, the PWA workspaces are migrated to SWA workspaces. This migration from PWA to SWA permits System Wide locking mechanisms to be used to ensure that, although multiple users have update access to the member, only one user is actually allowed to perform an operation (read or write) at any given time.

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Host Management of Shared Updaters

Supporting shared updaters for PC files using a construct which has a Directory and members, such as a library, partitioned data set, or folder, is achieved by blending the use of Process Wide Area (PWA) workspaces and System Wide Area (SWA) workspaces.

(Image Omitted)

PWA, the least expensive of the two types of workspaces, is used wherever possible to support a single updater in an environment which permits shared updating. When a second updater requests a member already in use, the PWA workspaces are migrated to SWA workspaces. This migration from PWA to SWA permits System Wide locking mechanisms to be used to ensure that, although multiple users have update access to the member, only one user is actually allowed to perform an operation (read or write) at any given time. When only one user is accessing a member, PWA is used. If shared updating of the member is never requested, SWA is never requested. When a second user begins to access the member, signalling the commencement of shared updating, processing for that member is switched from PWA usage to SWA usage. All subsequent updating and manipulation for the shared member is performed using SWA. All functions supported for a single updater environment are retained because the programs accessing the workspace used - merely on the addresses and availability of the workspace. Therefore, single updaters and shared updaters may be simultaneously using the same library, partioned...