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Variable Transparency in XDE

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034614D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gest, SB: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Variable transparency allows the user to reference both program/application variables and variables pertaining to the environment outside the application's domain without resorting to alternate commands or other syntactic schemes. XDE is an advanced software development environment targeted for the IBM RT PC* running IBM's proprietary UNIX** operating system, AIX***. This environment contains two types of variables: those which are specific to the environment itself, similar to shell variables, and those which are internal to the developing application. The environment variables, as well as the application's internal variables, may be referenced in some way to either obtain and print its value or to assign a new value. Variables which are not part of the application are environment variables.

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Variable Transparency in XDE

Variable transparency allows the user to reference both program/application variables and variables pertaining to the environment outside the application's domain without resorting to alternate commands or other syntactic schemes. XDE is an advanced software development environment targeted for the IBM RT PC* running IBM's proprietary UNIX** operating system, AIX***. This environment contains two types of variables: those which are specific to the environment itself, similar to shell variables, and those which are internal to the developing application. The environment variables, as well as the application's internal variables, may be referenced in some way to either obtain and print its value or to assign a new value. Variables which are not part of the application are environment variables. These variables are dynamically typed and do not require declarations. Environment variables are created by simply assigning a value to a variable name. If the variable does not exist, it will be created in the environment and stored in the environment's profile. The profile is a set of variables known to both the user and the environment and can be used to parameterize the environment. Profile variables are similar to shell variables in this respect. Variable scoping in the command interpreter is done in much the same way as in the host languages. Variables are searched first in local scope, then in global scope, and then in the environment scop...