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Application-Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034623D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 13K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Peters, A: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

This article describes a method for Application-Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition (AIMQTR). Application Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition addresses the problem of asynchronous and queued task recognition in multitasking workbench environments. A counterproductive usability problem arises when existing serial tasking workbench technology is integrated into a multitasked environment. Users must mentally distinguish between asynchronous, queued and non-executing tasks within task management lists. Users must also manually differentiate such tasks when selecting items from such lists. AIMQTR provides instantaneous recognition and selection of asynchronously executing and queued tasks through the use of unique highlighting oriented toward multitasking and task queueing.

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Application-Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition

This article describes a method for Application-Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition (AIMQTR). Application Initiated Multitasking and Queued Task Recognition addresses the problem of asynchronous and queued task recognition in multitasking workbench environments. A counterproductive usability problem arises when existing serial tasking workbench technology is integrated into a multitasked environment. Users must mentally distinguish between asynchronous, queued and non-executing tasks within task management lists. Users must also manually differentiate such tasks when selecting items from such lists. AIMQTR provides instantaneous recognition and selection of asynchronously executing and queued tasks through the use of unique highlighting oriented toward multitasking and task queueing. A fundamental usability problem has emerged as the concept of task management is integrated into a multitasked operating system environment. A multitasking operating system allows for multiple processes to be executed simultaneously, each sharing the resources of the computer. In the predecessor single tasked environment, the execution of tasks is serial: only one task can execute at once. Therefore, no task recognition problem exists for user task selection under a single tasking operating system. The capabilities of multitasking operating systems present new usability scenarios in which the user must select between tasks to be executed in the foreground (displayed on the terminal) and those already executing in the background or those scheduled to execute within a specified event window. The requirement to immediately recognize and select asynchronously executing tasks in a multitasked environment i...