Browse Prior Art Database

Limited Graphics Feature for Band Printer

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034634D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Mar-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 29K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Helinski, EF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Plotting and charting functions can be performed with a band printer by adding dot-producing elements in a rastered pattern on the band at a pitch equal to or greater than the product of hammer settle time and band-velocity. Fig. 1 illustrates a print band 1 having both engraved characters 2 and dot-producing elements 3, each with a respective, uniformly spaced timing mark 4. Elements 3 extend above and below the height of characters 2 to address vertical points in an array a sixth of an inch high. The rastered pattern may be repeated several times around the band. Horizontal spacing of elements 3 can be done either by providing a fixed horizontal distance between each element 3 and its timing mark 4, or by having groups of elements spaced at several different distances relative to their respective timing marks.

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Limited Graphics Feature for Band Printer

Plotting and charting functions can be performed with a band printer by adding dot-producing elements in a rastered pattern on the band at a pitch equal to or greater than the product of hammer settle time and band-velocity. Fig. 1 illustrates a print band 1 having both engraved characters 2 and dot-producing elements 3, each with a respective, uniformly spaced timing mark 4. Elements 3 extend above and below the height of characters 2 to address vertical points in an array a sixth of an inch high. The rastered pattern may be repeated several times around the band. Horizontal spacing of elements 3 can be done either by providing a fixed horizontal distance between each element 3 and its timing mark 4, or by having groups of elements spaced at several different distances relative to their respective timing marks. The first method requires electronic timing to address intermediate horizontal points to enable printing dots at micro-pitch intervals less than 0.1 inch, as seen in Fig. 2. The second method does not require generation of intermediate pulses for addressing but has slower throughput. Print band velocity is reduced for printing limited graphics by using a DC servo motor to drive the print band pulley. Motor speed is controlled via a phase-locked loop, using timing marks 4 for speed determination. Print hammer flight times may be readjusted for reduced impact energy and proper registration. Faster throughput can be...