Browse Prior Art Database

Method to Transactionally Configure a Telecommunication Network

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034661D
Published in the IP.com Journal: Volume 5 Issue 2 (2005-02-25)
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Feb-25
Document File: 2 page(s) / 26K

Publishing Venue

Siemens

Related People

Juergen Carstens: CONTACT

Abstract

With the new idea described below, the previous state of a network configuration can be restored after a failed configuration request has been issued by a Network Management System (NMS). This is performed automatically and transparently by the NMS. Until now, these Network Management Systems configure the managed networks and the partially achieved network configuration on a best-effort approach. When, for some reason, the requested network configuration failed, this is reported to the NMS operator. The NMS does not bring the network back to its initial state. A NMS could reset the settings of the network to its initial state, however this operation is done at the Network Management Layer and is very expensive in terms of development effort. Furthermore, it may require specific Network Element (NE) information, which is not usually available at this level.

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Method to Transactionally Configure a Telecommunication Network

Idea: Pedro Pessoa, PT-Alfragide

With the new idea described below, the previous state of a network configuration can be restored after a failed configuration request has been issued by a Network Management System (NMS). This is performed automatically and transparently by the NMS.

Until now, these Network Management Systems configure the managed networks and the partially achieved network configuration on a best-effort approach. When, for some reason, the requested network configuration failed, this is reported to the NMS operator. The NMS does not bring the network back to its initial state. A NMS could reset the settings of the network to its initial state, however this operation is done at the Network Management Layer and is very expensive in terms of development effort. Furthermore, it may require specific Network Element (NE) information, which is not usually available at this level.

The presented solution introduces a software component (the "Transactional Mediator") to be deployed between the NMS and the managed network (see Fig. 1). The NMS configuration transaction context is transported to this component, which handles the requested configuration as a whole and, in a failure situation, will restore the network configuration to its previous state and notify the NMS of the failed transaction.

In case the system is supported/implemented on a state of the art platform that supports distributed transactions by the usage of a transaction manager, it is...