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Browse Prior Art Database

Material for Repair of Photomasks With Focused Ion Beams

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034674D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 11K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Kirch, SJ: AUTHOR [+3]

Abstract

Disclosed is a new material, n-phenylmaleimide, for use in repair of clear defects in photomasks with focused ion beams. This material has several advantages over the commonly used styrene [*]. First the ion-induced deposits had higher resolution than those deposited from styrene. While patches made from styrene have edges much wider than the ion beam spot, those from n-phenylmaleimide are equivalent to the beam used in a laboratory (0.2 mm). The secondary electron yield from a patch changed when the patch was optically dense enough to be a repair. This gives a simple end- point detection scheme and allows in-situ evaluation of the repair. Since a minimum dose was required to initiate growth, merely imaging a region did not create deposits. This enables rapid switching between repair and imaging.

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Material for Repair of Photomasks With Focused Ion Beams

Disclosed is a new material, n-phenylmaleimide, for use in repair of clear defects in photomasks with focused ion beams. This material has several advantages over the commonly used styrene [*]. First the ion-induced deposits had higher resolution than those deposited from styrene. While patches made from styrene have edges much wider than the ion beam spot, those from n- phenylmaleimide are equivalent to the beam used in a laboratory (0.2 mm). The secondary electron yield from a patch changed when the patch was optically dense enough to be a repair. This gives a simple end- point detection scheme and allows in-situ evaluation of the repair. Since a minimum dose was required to initiate growth, merely imaging a region did not create deposits. This enables rapid switching between repair and imaging. Repairs can be made with roughly the same ion dose as with styrene even though the vapor pressure is roughly one hundred times lower than that of styrene. This reduces the strain on the vacuum system. Reference * L. R. Harriott and M. J. Vasile, "Focused Ion Beam Induced Deposition of Opaque Carbon Films," J. Vac. Sci. and Tech. B6, 1035 (1988).

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