Browse Prior Art Database

Apparatus for Inspection of Surface Contamination on Photoresist Artwork Mounted in a Frame

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034678D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 3 page(s) / 84K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Hecht, LC: AUTHOR

Abstract

Disclosed is a design for an apparatus which enables the inspection of glass artwork mounted in a metal frame for particle contamination on the artwork surface. This inspection can be done in a rapid, non- destructive, non-contact manner. A further unique feature of this disclosure includes the use of parabolic mirrors, Porro prisms, and four-way oblique lighting. The apparatus has the capability to detect particles on the artwork surface >10 microns in diameter. Fig. 1 is a top view of the apparatus. Fig. 2 shows a cross section along lines A-Al. Fig. 3 shows a similiar cross section along lines B-Bl. Fig. 4 shows the light path through the Porro prisms which are cemented together. Fig. 5 shows the light path from the parabolic mirror to the Porro prism. (Image Omitted) The light sources are the 35 mm slide projectors.

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Apparatus for Inspection of Surface Contamination on Photoresist Artwork Mounted in a Frame

Disclosed is a design for an apparatus which enables the inspection of glass artwork mounted in a metal frame for particle contamination on the artwork surface. This inspection can be done in a rapid, non- destructive, non-contact manner. A further unique feature of this disclosure includes the use of parabolic mirrors, Porro prisms, and four-way oblique lighting. The apparatus has the capability to detect particles on the artwork surface >10 microns in diameter. Fig. 1 is a top view of the apparatus. Fig. 2 shows a cross section along lines A-Al. Fig. 3 shows a similiar cross section along lines B-Bl. Fig. 4 shows the light path through the Porro prisms which are cemented together. Fig. 5 shows the light path from the parabolic mirror to the Porro prism.

(Image Omitted)

The light sources are the 35 mm slide projectors. Each light beam is split by a 50% beam splitter so that both halves of the beam are diverted up to strike the parabolic mirrors. These diverge the beams such that the active area of the artwork is now illuminated. The double-cemented Porro prisms allow the light to be bent over the metal frame and also to be projected in a oblique manner across the artwork

(Image Omitted)

surface. The Porro prisms and the parabolic mirrors are mounted to the hinged top. When the top is opened, the artwork mask is placed upon the stage. When the top is closed, the Porro pris...