Browse Prior Art Database

Method for Simplifying System Cable Assembly

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034709D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 188K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Gullicksrud, J: AUTHOR [+8]

Abstract

This unitized cabling design allows all internal cabling in a small computing system to be built as a complete subassembly prior to installation in the system chassis. The design includes features allowing individual connectors on the cable assembly to "Float", providing a means whereby they can automatically self-center as system components are plugged during installation. (Image Omitted) A side view of a computing system 1 is shown in Fig. 1. System cabling (not shown) consists of a power cable formed of discrete wires with many connectors and a signal cable composed of a flat ribbon cable with numerous folds and connectors. Both cables must allow connection to power and I/O devices 2 and 3 with movement available to permit these devices to self-connect under all tolerance conditions.

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Method for Simplifying System Cable Assembly

This unitized cabling design allows all internal cabling in a small computing system to be built as a complete subassembly prior to installation in the system chassis. The design includes features allowing individual connectors on the cable assembly to "Float", providing a means whereby they can automatically self-center as system components are plugged during installation.

(Image Omitted)

A side view of a computing system 1 is shown in Fig. 1. System cabling (not shown) consists of a power cable formed of discrete wires with many connectors and a signal cable composed of a flat ribbon cable with numerous folds and connectors. Both cables must allow connection to power and I/O devices 2 and 3 with movement available to permit these devices to self-connect under all tolerance conditions. Connection of both power and signal cables to logic cage 4 in the system does not require the connectors to float, as self-connection is not required. The cabling function resides in an approximately three-inch wide area 5 in the center of the system chassis. The system chassis is of monocoque construction and access to the cable area is limited to the front or back of the chassis through openings in several bulkheads and from the top through a small access opening before cage 4, devices 5 and power 2 are installed. Ease of assembly of separate with attendant parts into the chassis is poor at best.

(Image Omitted)

Figs. 2 and 3 detail the use of a unitized cable assembly that solves the access problem. Referring to Fig. 2, a molded plastic carrier 20 is designed which can be inserted through openings in the chassis bulkheads and solidly fastened with four to six screws through keyholes 93 in the carrier main web. Connectors 83 on the signal cable are mounted to carrier 20 by virtue of a pair of molded plastic housings 94 that snap together, trapping the connector and the carrier web between them. A second signal cable 84 is mounted via a screw fastened metal plate 85 to a molded slide 86, which, in turn, is mounted to carrier 20 web. Ends of the branches 100 that connect to cage 4 are simply left with a short free end and an external connector 90 is rigidly mounted to carrier 20 by virtue of a pair of molded plastic housing 94 that snap together, trapping the connector and the carrier web between them. A second signal cable 84 is mounted via a screw fastened metal plate 85 to a molded slide 86, which in turn is mounted to carrier 20; a power distribution connector 87 serving to fan power leads out to the various devices is also screwed to carrier 20.

(Image Omitted)

Branches from power connector 29 to the various devices have their connectors 82 (shown in Fig. 2) attached with the same mountings as the corresponding signal connectors. Ends of the power branches 67, 52, and 86 that connect to cage 4 and other location...