Browse Prior Art Database

Algorithmic Random Pattern Generation Using Deterministic Seeds

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034736D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Waicukauski, J: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

Disclosed is an algorithmic random pattern generation method which integrates advantages of pseudo random patterns and deterministic patterns. This algorithm reduces test data volume, minimizes test generation time, and provides high test coverage. To gain total control of the number of random patterns, an algorithmic method is adopted to generate Algorithmic Random Patterns (ARPs) using a deterministic pattern as the seed. A cost-effective objective proposed by this method is to use existing test generation and fault simulation tools to achieve goals. The procedure is as follows: Step A: The first step of the ARP generator is to use a deterministic test generator such as PODEM 1, FAN 2 or D-algorithm 3 to generate one (and only one) pattern.

This text was extracted from a PDF file.
This is the abbreviated version, containing approximately 56% of the total text.

Page 1 of 1

Algorithmic Random Pattern Generation Using Deterministic Seeds

Disclosed is an algorithmic random pattern generation method which integrates advantages of pseudo random patterns and deterministic patterns. This algorithm reduces test data volume, minimizes test generation time, and provides high test coverage. To gain total control of the number of random patterns, an algorithmic method is adopted to generate Algorithmic Random Patterns (ARPs) using a deterministic pattern as the seed. A cost-effective objective proposed by this method is to use existing test generation and fault simulation tools to achieve goals. The procedure is as follows: Step A: The first step of the ARP generator is to use a deterministic test generator such as PODEM 1, FAN 2 or D-algorithm 3 to generate one (and only one) pattern. Since only one pattern is needed, the test generator takes a relatively small time to complete the task. Step B: This deterministic pattern is used as the first seed to generate algorithmic random patterns. Step C: Simulate the generated ARPs using a fault simulator. A fault simulator simulates all generated ARPs and marks off faults which were tested from the fault list. The remaining faults, which are not marked off, form an "untested fault list." Step D: The ARP test generator returns to the deterministic test generator and asks for one (and only one) additional pattern based on the untested fault list. Step E: Repeat steps B, C and D until no more determinis...