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Power Cycling Simulation by Radiant Heat

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034740D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 47K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

DiGiacomo, G: AUTHOR

Abstract

This article proposes that power cycling tests be performed by the use of radiant heat directly and uniformly impinging on chips or devices from a controllable heat source placed in their immediate vicinity while the rest of the substrate area is shielded from the heat by an insulating mask. In this manner the chip temperature will rise quickly while the heat to the substrate will have to travel by diffusion through the interconnections, thus building a thermal gradient across the joints as in the case of electrical power cycling. Generally, the fatigue of electronic components' joints is determined by electrical power-cycling. The power is applied to the chip cyclicly to induce fatigue failure of the joints.

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Power Cycling Simulation by Radiant Heat

This article proposes that power cycling tests be performed by the use of radiant heat directly and uniformly impinging on chips or devices from a controllable heat source placed in their immediate vicinity while the rest of the substrate area is shielded from the heat by an insulating mask. In this manner the chip temperature will rise quickly while the heat to the substrate will have to travel by diffusion through the interconnections, thus building a thermal gradient across the joints as in the case of electrical power cycling. Generally, the fatigue of electronic components' joints is determined by electrical power-cycling. The power is applied to the chip cyclicly to induce fatigue failure of the joints. The cycling produces strains in the components' interconnections as a result of the thermal mismatch with the substrate and determines the fatigue-life of the interconnections as a function of strain amplitude, frequency, and temperature. Power-cycling tests, however, are quite expensive and require a great deal of time in test preparation and performance. In addition, only electrically good modules can be used. Another approach to fatigue testing is to thermal cycle the components in a thermal cycle chamber in which chips(s) and substrate maintain the same temperature during the cycle. However, this does not faithfully represent the field conditions as the temperature rises and, therefore, the strain rate is much slo...