Browse Prior Art Database

Data Integrity in a Network Environment

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034844D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 1 page(s) / 12K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Atkinson, RL: AUTHOR [+5]

Abstract

A program is disclosed that prevents a database from being corrupted in a network environment when multiple Data Base Managers are connected to a database through the network file redirection. The OS/2 Data Base Manager uses standard OS/2 files for storing user data bases. The file system, where the database resides, could be a network drive; this is transparent to the Data Base Manager. A network drive could be known to multiple systems on the network. Each one of the systems could have an active Data Base Manager. Each Data Base Manager has its own buffer pool, lock list, and RAM control blocks for concurrency control and data integrity protection.

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Data Integrity in a Network Environment

A program is disclosed that prevents a database from being corrupted in a network environment when multiple Data Base Managers are connected to a database through the network file redirection. The OS/2 Data Base Manager uses standard OS/2 files for storing user data bases. The file system, where the database resides, could be a network drive; this is transparent to the Data Base Manager. A network drive could be known to multiple systems on the network. Each one of the systems could have an active Data Base Manager. Each Data Base Manager has its own buffer pool, lock list, and RAM control blocks for concurrency control and data integrity protection. When more than one of these Data Base Managers are connected to a data base on a network drive, each will attempt to control concurrency and integrity with their own buffer pool, lock list, and RAM control structures. However, each active Data Base Manager does not know the others exist. The end result is that the Data Base Managers will corrupt each other's permanent data on the disk. The solution implemented by the OS/2 EE Data Base Manager is to have each copy of the Data Base Manager create a background process when it first attempts to connect to a database. This background process will create a zero length OS/2 file with a predefined name. This file will be created in the data base directory and locked exclusively by the background process. When other copies of the Data B...