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Radio Frequency Radiation Suppression Clip

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034846D
Original Publication Date: 1989-Apr-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 2 page(s) / 36K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Archer, KF: AUTHOR [+2]

Abstract

The metal housing in which much electronic equipment is contained provides suppression of radio frequency (RF) radiation generated within the housing. Covers which open but do not make a good continuous contact with the main housing, can result in a thin aperture along the front of a cover which acts as a wave guide or slot anything allowing electro-magnetic waves generated within the machine to be transmitted through such apertures or gaps. An RF radiation suppression clip can be used to give a mechanical join that divides the length of the aperture in half, so doubling the top frequency below which suppresion takes place. The mechanical join is effected using a spring-type finger that clips onto the front panel and presses against the top cover when it is fitted.

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Radio Frequency Radiation Suppression Clip

The metal housing in which much electronic equipment is contained provides suppression of radio frequency (RF) radiation generated within the housing. Covers which open but do not make a good continuous contact with the main housing, can result in a thin aperture along the front of a cover which acts as a wave guide or slot anything allowing electro-magnetic waves generated within the machine to be transmitted through such apertures or gaps. An RF radiation suppression clip can be used to give a mechanical join that divides the length of the aperture in half, so doubling the top frequency below which suppresion takes place. The mechanical join is effected using a spring-type finger that clips onto the front panel and presses against the top cover when it is fitted. This principle extends to having several clips connecting the two surfaces, progressively raising the frequency below which suppression takes place. The clip can be of conducting springy material, such as beryllium copper and this design has the special feature that it can be pressed or stamped in a single machine operation. The figures show the detailed design of such a clip.

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