Browse Prior Art Database

Mass Storage Assembly for Continuous On-Line Data Processing Applications

IP.com Disclosure Number: IPCOM000034907D
Original Publication Date: 1989-May-01
Included in the Prior Art Database: 2005-Jan-27
Document File: 4 page(s) / 102K

Publishing Venue

IBM

Related People

Dinwiddle, JM: AUTHOR [+4]

Abstract

A technique is described whereby off-the-shelf personal computer devices can be assembled in such a way so as to provide a low-cost mass storage environmental package. The concept provides an input/output (I/O) assembly and mechanical architecture which accepts low-cost data processing media. It is particularly adaptable to fault-tolerant applications, through the use of mirrored configurations, which provide on-line, non-stop system performance. (Image Omitted) Typically, packaging densities of mass storage devices, such as DASD, sequential access tape devices and optical media, combined with various I/O interface standards have provided designers with a variety of choices for I/O subsystems.

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Mass Storage Assembly for Continuous On-Line Data Processing Applications

A technique is described whereby off-the-shelf personal computer devices can be assembled in such a way so as to provide a low-cost mass storage environmental package. The concept provides an input/output (I/O) assembly and mechanical architecture which accepts low-cost data processing media. It is particularly adaptable to fault-tolerant applications, through the use of mirrored configurations, which provide on-line, non-stop system performance.

(Image Omitted)

Typically, packaging densities of mass storage devices, such as DASD, sequential access tape devices and optical media, combined with various I/O interface standards have provided designers with a variety of choices for I/O subsystems. Single-controller/single-device configurations are, however, necessary for many high performance system applications and large storage applications. The concept described herein focuses on the use of small packaging subassembly formats to provide flexibility, high density, ease of integration, and cost/performance considerations in attaining fault-free, nonstop operation and/or mass storage.

(Image Omitted)

The focal point of the concept is in the packaging of I/O devices, in a mirrored fashion, so as to provide fault-tolerant, nonstop operation. The concept is not confined to fault tolerant applications, but can also be used where mass storage is required. The assembly provides for three devices in a 'pack' arrangement, mirrored by a redundant set of three devices on the same assembly. The design is such that any of the interface standards can be configured, especially the small computer system interface (SCSI) standard. When used in fault tolerant applications, the design allows for on-line removal of any individual device in the event of a failure or field upgrade. Furthermore, all three devices on a 'pack' can be removed while the other three mirrored (redundant) devices continue operation.

(Image Omitted)

The concept described herein focuses primarily on the use of 5-1/4" disk drive storage devices, however, the same concept can be implemented to cover other disk storage sizes. The assembly includes three disk drive assemblies, 10, 11 and 12, as shown in Fig. 1, mounted in the front section of 19" rack assembly 13. At the rear of 19" rack assembly 13, a mirrored set of three disk drive assemblies is mounted, as shown in Fig. 2. At the middle of the 19" rack, where

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the rear sections of the drives meet, the connectors, cables and power are positioned so as to provide ease of service, as shown in Fig. 3. In t...